Tim Redmond

No surprise: Your garbage rates are going up 23 percent

|
()

As expected, Recology sent in its application for a rate increase Dec. 11, and most residential customers will see a hike of 23.5 percent, or about $6.50 a month. The hikes will be more complicated for commercial operations and apartment buildings, depending largely on how much waste those outfits can divert into recycling or compost.

The proposal would change the way rates are charged: Residential customers, who now pay a fee for the black cans holding landfill-bound garbage, will start paying a monthly $5 fee overall and $2 for compost and recycling.Read more »

San Francisco, Third World country

|
()

The model is pretty well established, and has proven exceptionally lucrative  for big US corporations like Bechtel and big US banks -- and has been an utter disaster for dozens of developing countries: US banks loan money to countries that need infrastructure development -- and that money comes right back to US corporations that charge phenomenal prices to build roads, dams, mining operations, whatever, with a nice cut off the top to whatever powerful people need to be bribed (all tax-deductable, of course). Read more »

Wrong side of history

Newsom and Herrera had little support, even from fellow Democrats, when they started the same-sex marriage fight

|
()

tredmond@sfbg.com

In June, 2006, the august and powerful Association of Alternative Newsweeklies held its convention in Little Rock, Arkansas -- and to the surprise of most of us, former President Bill Clinton agreed to come and speak. He even took questions.

I had one.

"Mr. President," I said, "when Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, he knew it would cost his party votes in the South. But he did it anyway, because it was the right thing to do. Same-sex marriage is a civil-rights issue; why can't Democrats like you stand up and support it?"Read more »

Editor's notes

Outlook is Supreme-ly sunny for gay marriage

|
()

EDITOR'S NOTES The two prominent lawyers who helped bring same-sex marriage to the US Supreme Court, Theodore Olson and David Boies, started out their case with the notion that it would get to the highest court, and that the Court would find a fundamental Constitutional right to marriage equality.Read more »

Healthy school food delayed by bid protest

|
()

A proposal to bring fresh, healthy, locally produced food to San Francisco school kids ran into a roadblock when the losing bidder on the deal filed a protest, forcing the School Board to delay acton on the contract.Read more »

Willie Brown is so full of shit on Prop. 13

|
()

The Chron's conflict-laden columnist made an interesting admission Dec. 9: The multibillion-dollar tax loophole that allows corporations to avoid reassessments under Prop. 13 was all his fault:Read more »

The Housing Authority mess

|
()

Mayor Ed Lee seems to think that the controversy over Housing Authority Director Henry Alvarez is just going to blow over, but he's wrong. There's too much here. And it's not just about the lawsuits employees have filed or the sizable list of unhappy workers.Read more »

Same-sex marriage: What they're saying

|
()

Lots of statements getting issued on the Supreme Court's decision, reflecting both the desire of many elected officials to weigh in on this momentus event and some interesting differences in tone.

Assembly Member Tom Ammiano:

 

“This doesn’t decide anything on its own, but it opens the door for the U.S. Supreme Court to acknowledge that people in every state of this union should be able to form marriage unions with the partner of their choosing and not be limited by outdated customs and laws.”Read more »

The Supreme Court and same-sex marriage

|
()

Keep in mind that I'm not a lawyer and the news just broke. But it seems unlikely to me that the US Supreme Court would have taken up two key cases involving same-sex marraige just to rule narrowly on questions like standing. Read more »

Why the anti-leaks bill is so scary

|
()

If a bill that is now before the US Senate were in place in 2005, none of us would know about the CIA's secret offshore prisons. There's a lot of other secret stuff that never would have made it into print, too.Read more »