Tim Redmond

Editor's Notes

The peace movement gets the buzz-off during Fleet Week
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tredmond@sfbg.com

The Blue Angels buzzed the Castro Street Fair on Oct. 7, one of the planes missing the top of Twin Peaks by what looked like a few feet. And almost nobody seemed to notice.

The roar of the jets couldn't possibly compete with the energy onstage, where Cookie Dough and the Monster Show were acting out a Wizard of Oz sketch to the sounds of "Boogie Oogie Oogie." I only saw one guy in the crowd even looking up, and he was just kind of shaking his head. Read more »

The amazing library debate

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Some of the folks who oppose Prop. D (the renewal of the Library Preservation Fund) are angry -- really angry -- that the Guardian supported the measure. How angry? Well, library activist and critic James Chaffee did a detailed point-by-point chart dissecting our endorsement. He had some harsh words for us, too. And we have some responses.

You can read the entire exchange here. Scroll down and read from the bottom up. It's amazing.

Protecting TG people isn't just for TG people

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Some interesting analysis here of how gutting ENDA of protections for transgender people will in fact render the law pretty ineffective. This thing is really picking up steam.

Bad news for Ed Jew

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Ed Jew's lawyer is bailing out. This can't be good news for the suspended supervisor. Lawyer Bill Fazio cites "irreconcilable differences," which in legalese generally means "my client wants me to do something that's moronic or unethical and I'm not going to get caught in that swamp." It could also mean "my client doesn't want to pay my hourly rate anymore," which, given the complexity and extent of Jew's problems, isn't a good sign either. But generally, when it's about money the client just fires the lawyer. Read more »

Editor's Notes

Newsom to the Guardian: "I'm unhappy"
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tredmond@sfbg.com

The mayor of San Francisco stopped by Oct. 1 to tell us why we should endorse his reelection, and I walked away with a lot of information. For starters, the mayor is unhappy about a lot of things: he's unhappy about the murder rate, he's unhappy about Muni, he's unhappy about the Housing Authority ... he's even unhappy about his mayoral ride (the Town Car ought to be running on alternative fuel). Read more »

Newsom loves the Navy

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I realize that the mayor of San Francisco has all sorts of reasons why he doesn't want to offend the United States Armed Services (might embarass Nancy Pelosi or Dianne Feinstein). And I realize that past mayors have been friendly to the Blue Angels and supportive of Fleet Week as a revenue-generator for the city.

But this letter , which the folks at PRO-SF got through a sunshine request, is over the top.

Gavin Newsom, Mr. Read more »

Why North Beach works

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It's time to piss some more people off, esp. the folks who think that highrise housing=urban density=good.

The Chronicle just announced that the American Planning Association has designated North Beach in SF as one of the best neighborhoods in American Why?

The 41,000-member organization took note of the atmospheric collage of low buildings around such historic gathering places as Grant Avenue and Washington Square. Read more »

Trans discrimination sparks fight

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By Amber Peckham

One of the first waves of protest over the move in Congress to remove transgender people from an anti-discrimination bill came from the labor movement. Read more »

Pelosi sells out the trans community

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Barney Frank

Why are Nancy Pelosi and Barney Frank throwing the transgender community under a train? Read more »

How wifi might work in SF

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Slate has a great piece by Tim Wu, author of "Who Owns the Internet," that points out why Mayor Newsom's public-private partnership idea for municipal wifi will never work.

Wu's point (also bloggednicely in leftinsf)

"The basic idea of offering Internet access as a public service is sound. The problem is that cities haven’t thought of the Internet as a form of public infrastructure that—like subway lines, sewers, or roads—must be paid for. Read more »