Tim Redmond

Editor's Notes

Developer-driven planning is, by definition, terrible
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tredmond@sfbg.com

It's all unofficial at this point, but I'm hearing that Mayor Gavin Newsom is (finally) getting ready to appoint a new city planning director, a fact that sounds like an uninteresting bit of bureaucratic business but is actually one of the most important decisions he'll ever make. And it will impact everyone who lives in the city, for years to come.

The director of city planning holds an immensely powerful job in this town. Read more »

Talk about needing to "move on ...."

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By Tim Redmond

I can think of a lot of people I'd like to indict for conspiracy to commit terrible crimes in the period of time that we now call "the Sixties." Henry Kissinger would be near the top of my list. But I had kind of thought the country was ready to put that all behind us .... and then I read this. And I just keep shaking my head.

Was that really Robert Redford ....

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By Tim Redmond

... who called into Forum to complain that San Francisco isn't friendly enough to the film industry? Poor Robert -- he told Newsom that he decided to make his latest movie in Napa and L.A. because San Francisco wouldn't give him a $3 million "rebate."

Jesus. And Newsom says the city "has to do better." Better at what -- giving money away to rich film directors?

Newsom doesn't understand wifi

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By Tim Redmond

Gavin Newsom was on Forum this morning. Although Michael Krasny was easy on him -- not one tough question -- a few choice tidbits came out. One of my faves, when Krasny asked him about the fall wifi ballot initiative:

"There are 200,000 people in the city who don't have a computer or access to the internet at home." His wifi plan, he insists, will addres the digital divide.

But Mr. Mayor: The wifi contract with Earthlink and Google isn't going to give 200,000 people computers. Not even close. Read more »

Editor's Notes

The new Transbay Terminal plans suck
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tredmond@sfbg.com

I've looked at all the grand designs for the tower that will pay for the new Transbay Terminal, and I've read the architectural critiques, and frankly, I'm sick of it all. The plans are all ugly, and they're way out of scale for this city — but what really gets me is that this is how we've chosen to finance our civic infrastructure.

Why do we have to live with a giant high-rise office tower near the Transbay Terminal? Read more »

Why do we need a highrise, anyway?

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By Tim Redmond

KQED's Forum did an entire hour this morning on the proposed Transbay Terminal project, and the best question come for a seven-year-old.

The panelists were not exactly offering a visionary approach to urban planning: Dean Macris, the interim city planning director who never met a tall building he didn't like, was on, along with the Chronicle's John King, who thinks at least one of the p Read more »

Newsom doesn't need that money

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By Tim Redmond

Gavin Newsom does, indeed, have opponents this fall, but none of them are going to raise and spent a million bucks; in fact, none of them are going to make this enough of a race that Newsom will need to spend that kind of money. Read more »

UCSF gives city planning the royal salute

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By Tim Redmond

UCSF, which is developing a huge new campus at Mission Bay, wants to put a new research facility a few blocks away on Third Street. The Pritzker Center would focus on mental health for kids, and I'm all in favor of that. Read more »

Manhattanization, from LA to SF

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By Tim Redmond

Joel Kotkin, the widely known urban writer and thinker, has a fascinating piece in the Sunday L.A. Read more »

Daly will not run for mayor

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By Tim Redmond

Sup. Chris Daly, who was talking over the past few days about a campaign for mayor, has decided against it. He sent a statement tonight; I'll post the whole thing:

Progressive Allies and Friends,

For the past 6.5 years, we have enjoyed strong
progressive politics in San Francisco. Progressive
San Francisco has delivered a new era of worker’s
rights with the nation’s highest minimum wage,
universal health coverage, and paid sick days.
Requiring significant amounts of affordable housing
and other public benefits, we’ve made development work
for communities. Read more »