Victoria Nguyen

Pot in the kettle

Learning the finer points -- and the health benefits -- of cooking with cannabis
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culture@sfbg.com

Save for the teeny-weeny skirts and gunfights, Sandy Moriarty is like Nancy Botwin, the main character of Showtime's Weeds. To casual observers, these women may look like regular God-fearing folk, but in their circle of marijuana smokers and edibles-eaters, both are local celebrities. Read more »

Quintessence

Sins Invalid puts the spotlight on sexuality and disability
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THEATER San Francisco's Brava Theatre is mostly dark, except for the spotlights on stage. Under the white light, singer Nomy Lamm's face peers out from under the beak of a vulture headpiece. She flaps her feathered wings and thrusts her hips, like she is working a hula hoop in slow motion.

"I remember the feel of your hands on my body," Lamm sings. "Makes me scream, 'Am I broken?'"

It is three weeks before the premiere of this year's Sins Invalid's performance art show of the same name, and artistic director Patty Berne sits near the back of the theater. Read more »

Theater You Can Eat

A play that examines how what we put in our mouths can affect our souls, minds, and the way we interact with one another
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PREVIEW For me, the next-best pleasures to actually eating food are reading about food (Laura Esquival's Like Water for Chocolate), watching movies about food (Juzo Itami's 1985 Tampopo), and singing about food (Millie Small's My Boy Lollipop). Now I've found another option, and that is to watch theater about food. Read more »

"Good Boys and True"

Wealth, privilege, power, and a sex tape
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PREVIEW According to St. Joseph's, an all-boys prep school, its students are expected "to be good boys and true. To strive towards competence, courage, and compassion always." Well — easier said than done, right? In Good Boys and True, scandal erupts at the Washington, D.C. prep school when a violent sex tape is discovered circuutf8g campus grounds. When Brandon, captain of the football team, is accused of being the faceless figure in the tape, his life and the lives of those closest to him are changed forever. Read more »

Whoop Click!

How a poisonous spider bite leads to a two-week holiday at a fat camp in Florida
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PREVIEW Like most superhero tales, actor-comedian James Judd's story begins with a spider bite. He hopes the incident will give him superpowers (specifically the ability to manipulate ATM machines with his eyes), but it never comes. Instead, the nasty bite gives him an excuse to, well, sit on his butt. And it is in his treacherously hot Palm Springs home that our hero gains a lot of weight.

In his newest show, Judd tells the story of how a poisonous spider bite on his butt leads to a two-week holiday at a decrepit fat camp in Florida. Read more »

The show must go on!

Bay Area theater companies battle the recession and try to stay afloat
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a&eletters@sfbg.com

Furloughs. Layoffs. Cutbacks. These are the dirty words that have been added to the vocabularies of those working in Bay Area theaters ever since, as one person so eloquently phrased it, "the shit hit the fan." It's hard to pinpoint when it began, but most theater heads agree that by October of last year, the somber headlines regarding the economy began to feel frighteningly real. Theater companies of all sizes have reported reduced ticket sales, lower individual donations, and less foundation and grant giving. Read more »

Sha Sha Higby

Enter a mysterious and haunting world of child-like wonders
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PREVIEW To achieve inner calm, you could do an hour of yoga, meditate on a seaside cliff, or pamper yourself at a spa retreat. But if you don't have the time (or lack the funds), you could also attend a Sha Sha Higby performance to leave you feeling reflective, refreshed and inspired. Higby began her artistic career before she was even qualified to attend preschool. At age 3, a drawing of a single bird launched the artist into a new world of expression. Read more »