Facebook

Facebook IPO: The good and the bad

|
()

Facebook went public and the people who got in at the initial price of $38 made a little money, but the stock is hardly exploding in the way that suggests social-networking is the next stock market darling. Read more »

Weblining

The Internet you see is based on your visual portrait -- who do advertisers think you are?

|
()

Something to make you feel better about all your compulsive newsfeed scanning: Facebook is watching you, too. And just like you as you click through so-and-so's party photos from last weekend, it's getting judge-y.Read more »

The bubble is back

City policies are encouraging a new tech boom — but have we learned any lessons from the last one?

|
()

steve@sfbg.com

San Francisco's future is in the process of being written, once again using lines of computer code and blips on the screens of electronic gadgets, the same as during the last dot-com boom. Its proponents insist it will be different this time — that Boom 2.0 won't displace the working class, that the bubble won't burst — but critics have their doubts.Read more »

Editor's notes

Bow down to Zuckerberg, our lord and master

|
()

tredmond@sfbg.com

Sometimes I love my Internet trolls. Not very often — mostly, the anonymous folks who call me a success-hating commie who's just jealous because he wasn't smart enough to start Facebook seem to come from somewhere far to the right of San Francisco. And they're rude. And they won't give their names. And fuck all of you, ya know?

But someone came along the other day and made a comment that so perfectly summarizes everything that's wrong with American political economics today that I just wanted to wave it around like a flag and tell everyone:Read more »

Mark Zuckerberg will pay less tax than you

|
()

Before we start talking about the Facebook Windfall and all the nice new tax dollars the company will pour into the state treasury, let me take a moment to put this in perspective. Read more »

Facebook: More rich people. Just what we need.

|
()

So Facebook is going public, and a homeless artist is going to get $200 million. Nice. And a company that has spent eight years spying on your private life (with your consent, of course, although admit it, you didn't know exactly how the data mining worked and how much these folks now know about you) is going to pick up a few billion dollars for selling your secrets to advertisers. Read more »