MUNI

Western SoMa Plan changed to lessen development impacts to nightlife and Muni

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The Western SoMa Community Plan had its first hearing before the Board of Supervisors Land Use and Economic Development Committee today, with dozens of speakers praising the eight-year citizen-based planning effort that developed it but with much of the testimony criticizing the plan's emphasis on facilitating housing development to the exclusion of other goals.Read more »

Free Muni for youth a rare progressive victory

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The left isn't winning all that much these days, but Sup. David Campos had a huge victory with the passage of a plan to offer free Muni to some 40,000 low-income kids. The challenges aren't over -- it's still not clear, for example, how the actual clipper cards will be distributed -- but this is a big step forward.

And it didn't come easily. Campos worked with a coalition of low-income advocates that refused to give up despite two years of setbacks.Read more »

Left-right punch knocks out increased development fees for Muni

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A new and unusual coalition of nonprofit, religious, and corporate interests today killed a legislative effort to get more money for Muni through the Transit Impact Development Fee, which was going through its process of being reauthorized every five years and came to the Board of Supervisors today.Read more »

Why free Muni for kids makes sense

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For a moment this morning, Mission Street looked the way it might in a world where the city actually got beyond cars. About a million people were a block away, on Market, and everyone with an ounce of sense knew not to try to drive downtown. So I rode my bike along a busy city street that was given over entirely to pedestrians, bicycles and Muni buses. The buses moved at a rapid clip with no traffic to slow them down. And despite the parade a few hundred feet to the north, it felt ... quiet. Peaceful. Yes, Mission Street.

How totally cool.Read more »

Hate (and free) speech

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How far can you push free speech? Is it okay for Muni to run ads that are utterly, inexcusably offensive to Arabs and Muslims in the name of political expression? Read more »

Local parking permits -- and fees

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So the city's going to take a look at the neighborhood parking program. Good. Here's my first question: Why do the car owners get away so cheap?

It costs $64 a month to buy a Muni Fast Pass. It costs at least $300 a month to rent a garage. But if you're in the neighborhood parking program, you get essentially a guaranteed parking space on a city street -- public property -- for $104 a YEAR, or about 28 cents a day.

That's crazy.Read more »

Morning Muni shutdown commemorates death of Kenneth Harding, Jr.

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More than 50 protesters disrupted Muni service for about an hour this morning before peacefully leaving to march down Market, in commemoration of the death of Kenneth Harding, Jr., on July 16, 2011.

After gathering at 14th and Market, the group marched to the intersection of Duboce and Church, where Muni trains headed outbound exit the tunnel. Soon, at least four outbound trains and two inbound trains were backed up.

Buses replaced their service. Read more »

Free Muni for kids: Tough slog at the MTC

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There are plenty of reasons I like the David Campos free Muni for youth plan. Anything that gets the next generation used to seeing Muni as the primary form of transportation in town is a good idea. It's a great benefit for low-income kids (and around SF these days, the only ones who we're giving any benefits to are businesses that get tax breaks, and those breaks are worth far more than the modest cost of the Campos plan). Read more »

Big (Robot) Brother is watching you on Muni

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So I'm not usually the paranoid type (I said usually), but this one is a little creepy: According to Fast Company, Muni is going to deploy a camera system that can detect criminal or potential terrorist behavior -- without a human being.Read more »

Where would Jesus park?

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The Examiner's big front-page head, "Pay to Pray," reflects the opposition of some religious folk, including the Rev. Amos Brown, who was one of the worst supervisors in San Francisco history, to Sunday afternoon meter enforcement. OMG! People won't be able to go to church because they'll have to feed the meter! It's sexist, too, since: Women go to church! And, apparently, none of the Rev. Brown's parishoners walk or take the bus.Read more »