Come drink and put Lyon Martin over the top

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Labor and transgender activist Gabriel Haaland reports that supporters of Lyon Martin Health Services have almost reached their $250,000 to save the clinic. Almost. Come help put them over the top on Wed/9 when I and other "celebrity bartenders" will be pouring stiff ones in a benefit event at the Buck Tavern (aka Daly's Dive), 1655 Market, starting at 6 pm. Donation of $5-$20 requested. See you there.

Heart attack!

What to do with your love (or possibly find a new one)? Check out the whens and wheres of Valentine's love week.

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V-DAY Be still your beating valves — you'd have to sprint to make it to all the V-Day lovin' in town this week, whether you're domesticated, on the prowl, or straight-up taking a pass on Hallmark-mandated caresses.

 

Jungle Love Read more »

A public apology for recommending the recent Madlib live DJ set

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When you recommend an event, you're basically telegraphing expectations on an artist's body of work. However, there is risk involved with live appearances.

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Editorial: Stop the War on Fun

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A local nightlife producer has won a tentative settlement in a false arrest and police abuse lawsuit against San Francisco. The deal still needs the approval of the supervisors, but it involves a significant chunk of cash. And it comes on the eve of what would have been a very public and — for the city — embarrassing trial shows how costly and pointless the police department's crackdown on nightlife has been.

In the case, Arash Ganadan claimed that Officer Larry Bertrand handcuffed him and hauled him off to jail outside a South of Market loft where the 27-year-old party producer was meeting with friends. Bertrand, the allegations stated, was mad that Ganadan had filed a complaint against him after an earlier club bust. Bertrand has since been reassigned. Read more »

Snap Sounds: Charanjit Singh

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CHARANJIT SINGH
10 Ragas to a Disco Beat
(Bombay Connection)

Pure zaniness: acid house from 1982 -- up to four years before the genre was invented -- that demonstrates Bollywood composer Singh's intuitive and innovative proficiency with the genre's prototypical Roland keyboards and drum machines. This reissue removes the word synthesizing from the beginning of the album's initial title, to downplay the kitsch factor, I guess. The mix of repetition and raga variation runs from meditative to maddening and is sometimes outright revelatory. One of a kind. After the jump, check out a comic and informative short movie from last year in which an enthusiast seeks out and meets Singh, and a few tracks from the album. As one online commentator suggests, it's time to put a bindi on the acid smiley. Read more »

Snap Sounds: James Blake

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JAMES BLAKE
James Blake
(Atlas)

This is probably the most-anticipated album of 2011, thanks to the promise of Blake's lavishly praised EPs, which have conjured the ghost of Aaliyah ("CMYK" draws brilliantly from "Are You That Somebody?") while deploying a innovative sense of dubstep's space and silence. (See the starts and stops and teasing not-there quality of "I Only Know (What I Know Now)" for an example.) Here, Blake adopts a more traditional pop vocal songwriting approach akin to his cover of Feist's "Limit to Your Love," which is included. The result teeters between Kid A-era Radiohead angst and something a lot more interesting and unique — a singular interplay between the possibilities of composition and production. Read more »

The Free University of San Francisco kicks off teaching -- to a lot of white people

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“A piece of blank paper means anything you want can happen,” SF beat poet laureate Diane Di Prima was imparting a rare free lecture on shamanic poetry, the marquee event of this weekend's popular first Free University of San Francisco teach-in at Viracocha. She had a packed the antique store-community center's first floor showroom, encouraging in regards to the FUSF collective's run at making free education available to all. But if the Free University wants to teach the world, why are the vast majority of its students – let's not parse words here – white?

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Appetite: A tale of two (French) bistros

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On a cozy winter’s night (admittedly not forefront in anyone's mind given the weekend we just had), French bistro fare becomes supreme comfort food. Whether it’s a cassoulet of duck confit, white beans, and sausage or a steaming bowl of les moules with a side of frites, the French are masters of satiation. While my favorite bistros in the city remain Chapeau and L’Ardoise, recent visits to two provided gourmet sustenance with authentic French cheer. P.S. They are both taking Valentine’s Day reservations...

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Deconstructing Cinderella, deconstructing La Llorona

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They say you shouldn't judge a person until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes. Ana Teresa Fernandez, the featured artist in Galería de la Raza’s upcoming video exhibition “La Llarona Unfabled,” (opening Sat/12) has obliged in regards to that feminist foil, Cinderella. For her video installation, Fernandez spent hours standing wearing a melting pair of “glass slippers” made of ice on a dirty West Oakland street. The experience, she feels, left her more than qualified to criticize the social constructs embodied by fairy tale's scullery maid-cum-princess.

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SFBG Radio: Why the HuffPo deal sucks

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Arianna Huffington just sold the Huffington Post to AOL for $352 million. Johnny and Tim talk about why it's a bad deal for everyone except Arianna and her investors. Check it out after the jump. Read more »

Richard Johns is closer to developers than preservationists

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The controversial mayoral appointment of attorney Richard Johns to historian's seat on the Historic Preservation Commission is being challenged in court by Gertrude Platt and a group of local preservationists calling itself The Prop. J Committee. They are asking the judge to remove Johns from his post.Read more »

I solved the state's budget problem

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And you can, too! The Sacramento Bee has a handy tool to evaluate options for closing the budget gap -- and unlike some of the other versions of this I've seen, it actually offers a wide range of revenue options. I cleared up the $26 billion shortfall without cutting anything at all (except prisons; I checked the box for letting out low-level offenders early. I'd go even further, and repeal three strikes and the death penalty, but those options weren't on the table at the Bee).Read more »

SFBG Radio: Is the recession over?

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Is the recession really ending? The government says so -- but what do small businesses need to make that prediction real? Johnny and Tim discuss after the jump. Read more »

Love, Gainsbarre

Indiefest taps into new waves of interest in Serge Gainsbourg

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FILM/INDIEFEST "Oh, it's a problem with women," Serge Gainsbourg says in an interview clip only a few seconds into Pascal Forneri's entertaining and energetic made-for-TV documentary Gainsbourg, The Man Who Loved Women. For Gainsbourg, the problem was a rewarding one — women were the vehicle by which he moved from a brooding writer of chanson into a national and international provocateur and icon. Read more »

Dick Meister: Black Porters Led the Way

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Dick Meister, formerly labor editor of the SF Chronicle and KQED-TV Newsroom, has covered labor, politics and other matters for a half-century.


February is Black History Month, a good time to honor the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, one of the most important yet too often overlooked leaders in the long struggle for racial equality.

The union, the first to be founded by African Americans, was involved deeply in political as well as economic activity. It joined with the NAACP to serve as the major political vehicle of African Americans from the late 1930s through the 1950s.

Together, the two organizations led the drives in those years against racial discrimination in employment, housing, education and other areas, and in doing so, laid the groundwork for the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Read more »