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Vote to give Muni more money, raise the minimum wage, discourage real estate speculation, and send Campos to Sacramento

This Week's Paper

coverDavid Campos for assembly, Wendy Aragon for City College board, soda, Muni money and the anti-speculation tax round out a controversial list of election 2014 ENDORSEMENTS. Plus: Yarrr, it's the Treasure Island Music Fest! And a new book collects George Kuchar's shouts and murmurs.  Articles Online | Digital Edition

From the Blogs

Editorial: Shut down PG&E's Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant

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 The six-unit Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant was designed to withstand the strongest earthquake that geologists said could reasonably be predicted for the region near northern Japan. It was designed to withstand the largest tsunami that the experts expected. It had triple backups to keep the reactor cores cool in the event of a natural disaster.

But, as is often the case with spectacular catastrophes, nothing went according to plan. The earthquake was far stronger than anyone figured was possible. The combination of the flooding and the shaking overwhelmed all of the emergency systems. The radiation releases are already severe enough to cause significant causalities — in the best case scenario, the danger already far exceeds that of the Three Mile Island fiasco. In a wide array of worst outcomes, large geographical areas could be uninhabitable for hundreds of years — and 39 million people living in and around Tokyo could be at risk Read more »

An obvious problem with the Twitter tax break

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It should come as no surprise to anyone that businesses all over the city, including high-tech startups like Zynga, now think they ought to get a tax break, too. That's the problem with doing favors for one company (and let's face it -- for all the talk of revitalizing mid-Market, this is in essence a tax break designed to keep one company from moving out of town). Read more »

The Performant: Life is a BOA

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Bay One Acts festival turns 10

“Life is like a Boa,” the random stranger at the bus station (Nicole Hammersla) announces to the sweetly bemused young man (Ray Hobbs) she has marked as her test subject. Cleverly referencing both the reptile and the Bay One Acts festival -- through March 26 at Boxcar Theater -- in which she is performing, Hammersla goes on to demonstrate the action of being constricted by a giant snake, first on herself, and then on Hobbs. It’s a reference that perhaps doesn’t stand up to close examination, but for a moment at least you go with it. Life is like a snake sometimes, and sometimes a play. Sometimes coiled around you, smothering, dangerous, and sometimes unfolding swiftly before you, like a message pulled from an unexpected bottle washed to shore. 

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5 Things: March 22, 2011

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>>1. MIGHTY BIG HEAD Definitely check out the new Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico exhibit at the de Young -- the museum's permanent Oceania collection is jutifiably famous (and controversial), and the level of expertise at showcasing indigenous culture and art bleeds perfectly into the realm of ancient Veracruzians as well ... Read more »

US EPA, SF Health Department and Lennar accused of asbestos collusion

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The  SLAM Coalition of Bayview Hunters Point Community Organizations and the New Orleans-based Advocates for Environmental Human Rights held a press conference outside US EPA Region 9’s San Francisco office today to protest the contents of a string of emails they obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request that they claim “show conspiracy by the US Environmental Protection Agency Region 9 and the San Francisco Health Department officials to cover-up dangers of the Lennar Corp.’s development project at the Hunters Point Shipyard.” Read more »

EcoTuesday goes Free Range

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If you’re one of the 12 million people whose enviro-mind was blown by the online video “The Story of Stuff,” you may have the opportunity to ask the film’s executive producer, Erica Priggen, for more insights into communicating the damage of global consumerism via viral animation.

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Tiny city makes $250 mil from public power

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I wasn't paying much attention to the move by state Assembly Speaker John Perez to abolish the tiny town of Vernon, California -- until I read the column in today's Sacto Bee by Dan Walters. Walters thinks it's all about money -- Vernon's got a lot, neighborhoring L.A., which wants to annex Vernon, needs it.

But here's what's so interesting:Read more »

SFBG Radio: What if we stopped shopping?

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Today, Johnny offers a fascinating idea. The GOP in Arizona has been forced to back down on some of its worst immigration policies -- purely because of the economic impact. What if the 26 million or so American consumers who fall into the general category of the Left (and the anti-war Right) just stopped spending money on anything beyond essentials for one week -- a boycott against the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and in favor of taxes on the rich. Would it make anyone in Washington listen? You, of course, can listen all you want, after the jump. Read more »

Is the California GOP done?

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The folks at CalBuzz -- veteran political reporters who know their shit -- thing the CAGOP is teetering on the brink of irrelevance:

Like a herd of wooly mammoths at the end of the Pleistocne epoch, the California Republican Party is on the verge of extinction.Read more »

If we hadn't gone to war in Iraq

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This is nothing new, but at a time when every state and local government is scrambling for spare change, it's worth thinking about what what we could have done with the Iraq war money. For example:

We could have closed every single state’s FY2012 budget deficit—totaling nearly $112 billion -- nearly seven times over. That means no protests in Wisconsin, no mass teacher firings, and no school closures.

And:Read more »

Appetite: Dark and lovely Weavers Coffee

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Weaver’s Coffee: if you aren’t drinking it, you should be. Based in San Rafael, Weaver’s  has a chill, little shop serving and selling their coffee and teas. The shop fronts their roasting facility and offices, which I had the privilege of touring recently.

John Weaver, master roaster and founder, was Peet's master roaster for more than 20 years, working directly with the late Alfred Peet. He brings a masterful perfection to Weaver’s coffees and teas, with a refined eye and palate for sourcing the best beans internationally. He returns to his roots with Weaver’s (under his parent company, Wild Card Roasters), able to once again create small batch, individualized blends.

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Step-step-shamrock-step: Swing Goth takes a Paddy's turn

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Pretty much the only problem with mixing swing dancing and post-punk music – and Swing Goth founder Brian Gardner agrees – is knowing what kind of shoes to wear. Saturday night’s Steam Punktrick’s Day at 50 Mason Social House, a newcomer to the TL bar scene, saw all kinds: the heavy, thick-soled studded boots that are a staple for SF’s Goth crowd, the cute button-up Victorian high heels that are the trappings of steam punk-ettes, and the flat kicks that swing dancers wear to get a good mix of slide, support, and traction. Read more »

SxSW Music Diary: Day 4

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Last day in Austin. The hot daytime ticket was the MOG.com party at Mohawk. That meant getting there early and committing the entire afternoon... but the payoff was catching headliners TV on the Radio and Big Boi with just a few hundred other folks.Read more »

SxSW Music Diary: Day 3

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As we walked through downtown Austin we ran into Red and Green of Peelander-Z, the outrageously festooned Japanese punk band. They sweetly obliged a snapshot and then continued on their way. Just found out that they'll be touring with Anamanaguchi, the frenzied "Nintendo-core" band I saw on day 1. Make sure to check them out at DNA Lounge on April 7th.Read more »

Imagine evacuating New York

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My brother lives a few miles upwind (usually) of the Indian Point nuclear plant on the Hudson River, north of New York City. He called me this morning to ask if we were worried about radiation hitting the West Coast, which all of the government isn't anything to worry about. Of course, if it were something to worry about, we'd be hearing the same thing anyway.Read more »