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With climate change threatening life as we know it, perhaps it's time to revive the forgotten goal of spending less time on our jobs

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GREEN ISSUE: Save the planet, work less. Plus: Martinez Brothers, Hope Mohr Dance, Oakland Drops Beats, 'Faust,' more. Articles Online | Digital Edition

From the Blogs

Native American artists take back culture of their art

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“Museums are, historically, piles of loots with a roof on them,” says Kim Shuck as she carefully beads a black raven onto the back of a pow-wow vest in the de Young's Kimball education gallery. I go to touch her intricate stitching, then draw my hand back. Shuck is telling me about her work's cultural significance, the struggle of the Native American community to coexist with the white art world. Am I really about to manhandle her sacred creation? “I appreciate your impulse to touch, and then not be sure if you can,” she says laughing, as she grants her approval for me to poke and prod the curving lines of tiny beads. Moments like these are what her current project's about – exposing folks to indigenous art, and teaching them the limits and guidelines to their interaction with it. Read more »

We tax, they spend

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There's nothing terribly new about this data, but it's still worth a look. Guess who pays most of the taxes in California? The Democratic counties whose legislators don't mind raising revenue to solve the budget crisis. And guess who gets the greatest share of that tax money? The counties dominated by Republicans, who want to cut services and keep taxes low.Read more »

How SF can get $50 million a year from PG&E

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EDITORIAL Sup. John Avalos, who chairs the Budget Committee, is looking for ways to bring another $100 million into the city's coffers this year. There's a hotel tax initiative headed for the fall ballot. He's talking about an increase in the real-estate transfer tax for high-end properties. And he and his colleagues are looking into a tax on commercial rents.

Those are all valid ideas. But there's another way the city can bring in as much as $50 million more a year — without raising anyone's taxes. It just involves increasing the franchise fee Pacific Gas and Electric Co. pays to the city.

PG&E uses the city's streets and rights-of-way to run its gas lines and electricity cables; the company doesn't pay rent for that space. Instead, it pays an annual franchise fee to the city, a percentage of its gross sales. Other utilities pay, too — Comcast, for example, pays 5 percent of its gross to San Francisco every year for its cable-TV franchise.

PG&E pays 0.05 percent for electricity sales, and 1 percent for natural gas.

That deal was reached in 1939. The Board of Supervisors back then gave PG&E the lowest franchise fee in California, a pittance, a fraction of what other cities and counties charge — and the contract has no expiration date. It's a perpetual deal, something highly unusual.

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Judge orders UC police to hand over journalist’s photographs

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Remember when a crowd of angry student protesters surrounded the home of UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau last December, and broke some windows? And then Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called them terrorists? Read more »

Snap Sounds: Beach Fossils

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BEACH FOSSILS
Beach Fossils
(Captured Tracks)
Your pretty guitar — or in Beach Fossils' case, your gorgeous guitars. Lyrics and vocals are virtually beside the point, considering how poetic the guitar sounds are on these songs. Beach Fossils is well-listened enough to admire McCarthy and the Go Team. On "Youth" and "Wide Awake," the group comes up with something deeply emotive. You have to make the jump and join me on the other side to find out. Read more »

Meklit Hadero in full bloom

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Born in Ethiopia and raised in the U.S., songstress Meklit Hadero's musical endeavors span latitudes and genres. But there's also a timeless quality to her warmth and soulfulness that's reminiscent of archetypes like Nina Simone and Billie Holiday. A former director of the Mission's Red Poppy Art House, her recent debut album On A Day Like This was heavily influenced by her experiences as an integral part of the Mission scene. Read more »

Sunday Streets contrasts with SF's bike injunction

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A day after bicyclists and pedestrians took over the streets of the Mission for the popular, incident-free Sunday Streets, and a day before the court hearing on whether to end the four-year-old injunction against bike-related projects in San Francisco, Judge Peter Busch today (6/21) issued a noncommital tentative ruling in the case, indicating he needs a hearing on myriad technical details to reach a decision.Read more »

The Daily Blurgh: Corpse flower is not a '90s Goth band

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

I would love to hear what Judge Judy would say to the Petaluma mother who, passed out after drinking tequila, let her 2-year-old daughter wander out of her house. Barefoot. Oy.

*****
Where exactly is the Tenderloin?

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Solstice fun: Brown and Whitman's birthday personalities

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I’m probably going to get into all kinds of trouble for this post, but seeing as today is the summer solstice, and I have hay fever, now (as I wait for the antihistamine to kick in) feels like the perfect moment for fun with politicians’ personalities, beginning with California’s gubernatorial candidates, Jerry Brown and Meg Whitman. Read more »

SCOBY SCOBY do's and don'ts: Notes on the Kombucha craze

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By Katie Gaydos

For me, the words “kombucha on tap” evoke images of endless streams of free-flowing fizzy ambrosia. Unfortunately, while many San Francisco health food markets and juice bars now carry kombucha on tap, kegstands are not an option. Alas, a mere 12 oz. cup of the stuff sets you back anywhere from $3 to $6. Kombucha may be on tap, but as long as it remains on its designer drink pedestal, it’ll cost you. Read more »

Mundo Via Afrika: Roll up your shorts and kick it

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See video

World Cup fever has produced its share of pop tributes and hot girls visuals. You get both combined in the vibrant video for local boy Gavin Hardkiss' "Mundo Via Afrika!"

Ammiano wants to clean up crime labs

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Why could the San Francisco crime lab operate with so many problems for such a long time? One reason: There’s little or no effective state oversight or regulation of local crime labs in California.

That seems like a glaring problem -- crime labs can mean the difference between guilt and innocent, the difference between a long prison term and a free life, between an innocent party getting wrongly convicted and a guilty party getting away with murder.Read more »

SFBG Radio: Tim and Johnny on channeling the inner Huey Long

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Today, Tim and Johnny talk about GOP loonies, Carly and Sarah and the case for our inner Huey Long. You can listen after the jump. Read more »

Janelle Monáe: Soul with perfect teeth

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By Ryan Lattanzio

Janelle Monáe has the most beautiful teeth I’ve ever seen. No, really. If you ask me, their pearly whiteness is unmatched.

Just as much as she bared her teeth on Friday afternoon at Rasputin in Berkeley, she bared a little slice of her soul. Monáe stripped her many layers of production and favored an acoustic set – something she said she loves – performing “Tightrope,” the single off this year’s The ArchAndroid (Atlantic), and the gorgeous “Smile” from the 2008 EP Metropolis: The Chase Suite (Atlantic).

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Live Shots: 54th Annual North Beach Festival, 6/20/10

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You know it's summer time in the City when the smell of smoky meat wafts up your nostrils and jazzy tunes wind their way down the streets. As the marathon of fairs and festivals continues, where better to spend this weekend than at the North Beach Festival?Read more »