Top Story

Caption here (*required)

@Large: Ai WeiWei on Alcatraz" highlights contemporary struggles for freedom of expression

This Week's Paper

feast coverFEAST: How to eat and drink your way through Rio, Paris, Italy, the California Coast, the exotic Outer Richmond, and more! Plus: Climate change protesters flood New York, and comedian Lakshminarayanan's 'Nerd Nation.' Articles Online | Digital Edition

From the Blogs

PayPal freezes out other groups, who turn to WePay (UPDATED)

|
()

PayPal has lost customers and credibility after freezing the accounts of Burning Man's Temple Flux – a story we broke this week that triggered an overwhelming response that caused the company to back down – with many of them flocking to the more community-based alternative WePay.com. But the publicity has also unearthed even more stories of nonprofit groups getting their assets frozen by PayPal.

Groups ranging from the National Association of Injured Workers to Burning Man camps Comfort and Joy and Black Rock Diner tell the Guardian they've recently had their assets frozen without warning by PayPal, a multinational company owned by eBay that reported $2.2 billion in revenue last year and makes its profits mostly from interest and other returns from the money it holds for others.

Read more »

Jamie Stewart on orange juice, armpits, bird calls, and ambient music

|
()

On Friday 8/13, Berkeley Art Museum is hosting a project that is threefold: the visual art of David Wilson, short films curated by Max Goldberg, and the music of Jamie Stewart (Xiu Xiu). To find out more about this unusual collaboration, I spoke to Mr. Stewart on the phone about his contribution and how he anticipates the night will go down. Read more »

PG&E CEO paints a rosy picture for CPUC

|
()

Pacific Gas & Electric CEO Peter Darbee’s address to the California Public Utilities Commission yesterday focused on his company’s national reputation as a corporate advocate for addressing climate change, largely ignoring PG&E’s $46 million waste of ratepayer money supporting June’s failed Proposition 16, which was designed to expand the utility’s monopoly in California and thwart local renewable power projects. Read more »

Veterans of discrimination

|
()

So you're a gung-ho Hawaiian high schooler who wants to protect your country back in the early '40s. You join the ROTC, which leads to a spin through the Territorial Guard. You're then kicked out of service, because of where your family's from. In fact, you're now considered an enemy alien! Fancy. Such was the plight of the protagonists of Junichi Suzuki's 442: Live With Honor, Die With Dignity (which starts Fri/13 at Viz Cinema), Japanese-Americans who went on to become one of the most decorated squadrons in U.S. military history. Read more »

alt.sex.column: Special goop

|
()

Dear Andrea:

Have you seen those commercial for the new K-Y product, with all the geysers going off and so on? They're funny, but does the product work — and why? I have orgasms, but not always, Besides, anything that could make it even more fun ...

Love,

Happy Shopper

Dear Shop:

It's hard to miss those prim little couples with their giant expulsions of boiling fluids. They are pretty funny. But are they accurate?Read more »

SFBG Radio: A glorious future without PG&E

|
()

In this week's episode, Johnny and Johnny talk asinine budget impasse, Americans suckered into voting against their interests and a glorious future without PG&E.

Read more »

Appetite: 3 gourmet cheap eats on Sonoma

|
()

Not far off Sonoma's idyllic town square lie these three unique gems - you can eat high quality Eastern European, BBQ or Mexican food at a reasonable price. Read more »

The Performant: A mutable feast -- or, theater, buffet-style

|
()

If the venerable San Francisco Fringe Festival is a full-on Circus Circus-style, all-you-can-eat-buffet, I like to think of its kid cousin the San Francisco Theatre Festival  -- which took place Sunday, August 8 -- as more of a pu-pu platter. Tasty little morsels of performance presented in manageable, bite-sized chunks designed to whet the appetite for the main courses (the full productions) to come. I don’t know about you, but when I’m confronted with the choice between dainty nibbling, or cleaning each plate as it comes, I tend to adapt the life-is-uncertain principle and gorge myself on all the available goodies in sight.

Read more »

New and improv-ed

San Francisco Improv Festival returns to link past and future

|
()

The launching of the San Francisco Improv Festival, back in 2004, signaled a major resurgence for improvisational theater in the Bay Area, long dominated by the exceptional BATS (Bay Area Theatre Sports) and related groups, but recently joined by a host of newer outfits as well. The rollicking festival attracted eager audiences, while bringing together a somewhat disparate local and intergenerational community of improvisers with national and even international acts. Read more »

How to save Muni

|
()

 

Editors note: In this week's paper, we offered a series of proposals for discussion at the community congress Aug. 14th and 15th. Here's one that we couldn't fit:

By Jerry Cauthen

San Francisco is a transit-first city, yet its bus system is perennially in crisis. Everyone knows Muni needs fixing—but how do we do it in a way that honors the needs of both drivers and riders, while deepening San Francisco’s commitment to sustainability and transit innovation? How do we maintain and improve service when Muni and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency face deep budget deficits and service cuts on a regular basis?

Read more »

SFBG Radio: Crash

|
()

 

This week, Johnny and Johnny talk the bad numbers and go where no one else dares--is a world wide depression headed our way?

Read more »

Will the Potrero power plant be shut down by the end of the year?

|
()

At the beginning of 2010, the official word was that an undersea high-voltage power line called the Trans Bay Cable would go live in February, supplying up to 40 percent of San Francisco's power. This was the missing piece of the puzzle that would finally lead to the shuttering of Mirant's Potrero power plant, which activists and city officials have railed against for years. Read more »

Same-sex marriages set to resume in California

|
()

Same-sex marriages in California will resume on Aug. 18, barring a higher court issuing a stay. Judge Vaughn Walker today announced that he is removing the stay against new same-sex marriages that was in place since his ruling last week that Proposition 8, the 2008 ballot measure banning gay men and lesbians from getting married, was unconstitutional.Read more »

Edgar Wright vs. the World

|
()

Go here to read Sam Stander's review of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World in this week's Guardian. What follows is Stander's complete interview with director Edgar Wright.

San Francisco Bay Guardian: What is your favorite visual effect or sight gag in all of Scott Pilgrim?

Edgar Wright: Oh my god. There’s so much … I probably have to pick, off the top of my head, I like watching the twins scene because it was only very recently finished, so I’d have to pick that.
 
SFBG: How did you originally get involved in adapting Scott Pilgrim?

EW: I was given the book six years ago, when the first volume came out, by … the producers who had kind of leapt on the rights to it before it was even in bookstores. And I really loved the book, and I thought it would be a really interesting thing to try and adapt. At that point there was only the one book. [We] began a five-year process of working on it as [author Bryan Lee O'Malley] continued to develop the books, so the development of the film and the books kind of went in tandem in places. So it’s kind of been, six years ago I was given the book, and now the final book just was released, and the film is coming out, too. Read more »

Te Vaka paddles up with news from the South Pacific

|
()

Opetaia Foa'i's mother's ancestral home is sinking into the ocean. And he's not supposed to talk about it. Tuvalu, comprised of four South Pacific Islands whose combined mass comes to a grand total of ten square miles, has its own language, a distinct cultural heritage like many of its neighbors. But what struck Foa'i (who was born on Samoa and raised in an islander community on New Zealand) saw when he went back was that rising ocean levels had reached up the air strip his plane landed on. So he wrote a song about it. His music and dance group, Te Vaka (which comes to Great American Music Hall Fri/13) plays music that evokes not only the ancient tales of those faraway seas, but also the fact that they matter, here and now. Read more »