Pixel Vision

The great Oz speaks

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By Michelle Devereaux

True, Frank Oz has made his living for the last twenty years as a director of glossy, big-budget Hollywood comedies: from the mega-hits (Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, What About Bob?, In & Out) to the occasional colossal flop (The Stepford Wives). And for the discerning nerd, Yoda always he will be. But for me, it's hard not to meet the man and think of him as anything but a pig. Read more »

Boom, dream, flow: A look at Independent Exposure's animation

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By Maria Komodore

The exact moment when I decided to study cinema is very clearly imprinted in my memory. It occurred three years ago while I was watching Man Ray films.

What impressed me most about films such as Return to Reason, Ballet Mécanique, and Emak Bakia was the potential they seemed to add to the film medium. Strange, almost indistinguishable forms and shapes danced around on the screen to generate equally mysterious inner associations. Read more »

Monster Squaddin': a mash note

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By Sam Devine

So the City just killed Halloween (although, in all fairness, they had plenty of help from a few masked assailants and some assorted weaponry), but there may be hope for the haunted holiday yet. As long as you’ve got a DVD player.

What is surely the funniest and most watch-able monster movie of all time, “The Monster Squad,” (originally released in 1987) has just been dubbed a “cult classic,” and been re-released on DVD. Read more »

Strange powers: Notes on Stalker

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By Maria Komodore

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There aren’t many things that haven’t been written about Andrey Tarkovsky’s Stalker. Of course the film’s mysterious subject and Tarkovsky's even more mysterious direction do open the film up to all kinds of discussions. The story, if one can say that there is such a thing, revolves around an enigmatic Zone whose creation conditions never become quite clear. Read more »

Balls out: Tranny down

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One of our favorite trannies of all time, Felicia Fellatio, has just informed us that she will be OOC (that's "out of commision" for you non-TXTRS) for a while after a little necessary testicular surgery (nothing cosmetic, she informs us). But that's not gonna stop her from partying! Read more »

Access of Evil: Tweaker's Choice!

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How 'bout this for a shot of homegrown comedy -- and lord knows I need some after the homegrown shot of comedy that was my night at the sex club. Gurl, remind me NOT to wear my night goggles up in there. I saw too much! Too much!

The kids from the new queer comedy public access show "Access of Evil" just popped me a couple new rough vids of their sketches, and they're pretty bombatastic. You can catch the first "Access of Evil" installment on August 19 at 1am on Channel 29 -- and then every third Sunday of the month at 1am thereafter. Read more »

Careers and Ed: Paid to party

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By Molly Freedenberg

For some of us, playing is an escape from work. But for a lucky few, playing is their work. Sound like fun? It is, say the professional partyers we interviewed. But it's still ... well ... work. Read more »

The cradle will ROCK

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By Molly Freedenberg

Screw my red velvet duvet cover and all its soft, squishy opulence. If only I had an extra $1300, I'd redecorate my bed with a bit of bite from Quiltsryche. But since I'm poor, I'll just have to settle for going to sleep with Ministry on my headphones.

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Bangover, by Quiltsryche

Thanks to Thrillist for the tip.

Baby abuse is funny

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By Gazelle Emami

Remember stoichiometry? It tells us the relationship between certain reactants and products. Like two parts hydrogen plus one part oxygen equals water. Diet coke plus Mentos equals explosion. And a baby eating a lemon equals hilarious.

The Eclipse: One Day, Two Giants of Art Cinema Gone

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By Max Goldberg

It’s enough to make you wonder. Not twenty-four hours after headlines announcing Ingmar Bergman’s death at 89 news arrived of Michelangelo Antonioni’s end at 94. Both died this past Monday. They seemed on parallel tracks throughout their careers—producing strings of self-consciously intellectual films bent on existential meaning—making their alignment in death all too temptingly neat of a frame for the heavy eulogizing to come. Still, maybe they would have appreciated the coincidence: a flash of suggested meaning, the intimation of magical thinking. Read more »