SFBG Radio: Is college worthless?

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Is college worthless? Too expensive? One of the founders of PayPal thinks so, and he's paying kids to drop out. Johnny thinks -- well, maybe. Tim thinks that's completely ridiculous. Plus: a rant on American Idol. Check it out after the jump.

CollegeWorthlessSoIsAI by endorsements2010

Comments

Speaking for myself, I believe that I learned more while working than I did while attending three years of college. I worked after school during both my high school and college years at several types of jobs and I think that the on the job experiences
accelerated my ability to function in life better than my friends who never worked until
after they finished college. So with that, Johnny gets my vote. College did kind of slow me down.

Posted by Guest on May. 28, 2011 @ 6:36 pm

look at the bureau of labor stats - unemployment is not created equally. less educated you are, more likely to be hit harder in bad times and make less money over the course of a lifetime. but of course, there are huge exceptions to everything.
hey, some people smoke for decades and never get cancer. my mom had half her lung taken out to save her life. guess, what? I don't smoke.

Posted by Guest Tai-bo on May. 29, 2011 @ 1:38 pm

I enjoyed college, I enjoyed doing the reading. It's unfortunate that more people have done that reading. There are worse things to have read than Kierkegaard's "Fear and Trembling." There are worse things to read than Shakespeare's "King Lear." College disciplines the mind and teaches the mind to work in a specific direction. I do not begrudge my time spent in college. I also worked my way through college as a hospital orderly, so I saw another part of life that I might never have considered existed. Somehow working in a hospital and reading "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" or Dostoyevsky's "Underground Man" reincforced the meaning of the reading. And now as a senior citizen, education, classroom experience, is an integral part of my life.

Posted by Steven Torrey on May. 30, 2011 @ 7:08 am

Liberal arts is the basis for advanced society but society has "advanced" past the point where studying liberal arts is profitable. The labor market has been distorted intentionally to the extent that excess scarcity diminishes the chances of everyone, whether or not one has a college degree. Just like "we all have a chance to become a billionaire," education with its attendant debt is a crap shoot, where we learn all the wrong lessons and even then might end up underemployed. The problem with being educated and underemployed is that you know exactly how deep you are in a hell hole.

Posted by Guest on May. 30, 2011 @ 9:42 am

American music came from the South, jazz and blues and country and rock and roll--so now you don't accept that?

Elitist a-holes......

Posted by Gobie on May. 30, 2011 @ 10:05 am

College is like the cut in line pass at Disneyland. If you can afford it, then buy it. It's nice to walk by all the suckers waiting in line. That's the unfortunate truth.

On a happier note, it also develops the mind, fosters personal growth and gives people the mental ability to challenge the status quo. College does not necessarily transform people into employable corporate cogs, which is probably why business Bigwigs would like to see people drop out.

Posted by Guest on May. 31, 2011 @ 7:30 am

College is like the cut in line pass at Disneyland. If you can afford it, then buy it. It's nice to walk by all the suckers waiting in line. That's the unfortunate truth.

On a happier note, it also develops the mind, fosters personal growth and gives people the mental ability to challenge the status quo. College does not necessarily transform people into employable corporate cogs, which is probably why business Bigwigs would like to see people drop out.

Posted by Guest on May. 31, 2011 @ 7:32 am

You both are correct.

For some of us, college is a waste of time and money. I was one of the folks that was bright, energetic, resourceful, entrepreneurial and worked really hard. As Johnny posits, a degree was not needed. Until now.

Now, at 47 with two squashed businesses due to larger economic impacts (most start-ups fail), I need the education to even get looked at seriously by anyone. Tim's stance that an education broadens the perspective, opens doors, and increases opportunity is true, now more than ever before. Employers and potential investors are more cautious than ever about who gets into their circles. More often than not, it is the degree, the professors, and internships one knows and has experienced that open real doors for good.

Funny thing. My work ethic and life experience is proving to be very valuable in my degree progress, as Johnny is aware.

You are both correct. But I think Japan and some European countries really have it nailed. Go to school to meet the company that you want to finish your education with. Then work while you learn, eliminating the need for school loans. Life experience and education grooming one for success. No brainer.

Posted by College boy Todd on Jun. 01, 2011 @ 3:46 pm