Politics Blog

Newsom's party

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By David Crockett
In what was maybe the least surprising news story since that guy from ‘N Sync announced he was gay, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom seemed headed for an easy reelection, even with the sparse returns on election night, when he and his supporters gathered at the Ferry Building.

“The best is yet to come,” Newsom told his followers, at the beginning and end of his speech, adding, “As great as we are, we can still be so much more.”

The Yes on A victory

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Lots of celebration at the Yes on A/No on H party at El Rio. Robert Haaland, who ran the field campaign, was justifiably exuberant -- the passage of A and defeat of H, which appears all but certain, was a demonstration that even in a low-turnout election, progressives can prevail. The labor-and-environmental-backed campaign did an extensive absentee-voter effort, extensive get-out-the-vote and effective mail. It helped that Sup. Read more »

Low, low turnout

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The traditional wisdom is the the progressives lose in low-turnout races -- and turnout here looks terrible. John Arntz, the elections director, says it looks like 26 percent turnout, only around 100,000 votes. And yet, on the key progressive measures, we're doing really well.

More from City Hall

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Gavin Newsom has obviously won re-election, although we don't know his total yet. But the other winners tonight are Aaron Peskin and Chris Daly.

Peskin's Prop. A is an almost certain winner -- it's ahead 51-49 in the absentees and that's the most conservative of the votes, so it will win handily. His Prop K, the measure limit new billboards, is winning, too, overwhelmingly (60-40).

What this means is that Peskin defeated a rather vicious campaign by Don Fisher to smear him and the Board of Supervisors; in fact, the attacks on the Board didn't seem to work. Read more »

Results -- big surprise!

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Early results are in, and the mayor's race is no real surprise -- Gavin Newsom's at 77 percent, which is just the absentees, and that will drop. But the big news: In the very conservative absentees, Prop. A is just slightly behind -- and Prop. H is actually LOSING. That's over, and it's over big -- in the most important race for progressives, it looks like a clear and convincing victory. You can take this one to the bank -- Don Fisher has lost, big, and Prop A, the competing transit measure, has won.

The other big surprise: Prop. Read more »

Who's endorsing whom? A guide

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You're probably already acquainted with the Guardian's 2007 endorsements for the Nov. 6 elections -- but what about the city's other hot and steaming political bodies (yes, that sounded dirty). Below are endorsements from other groups, from the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club to the San Francisco Tenants Union. Read more »

Nuke tracker...just what I needed!

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From the good folks over at the Union of Concerned Scientists, this is the coolest tool ever for tracking the oops I did it again spills at our nation's nuclear power plants. Plus, there are deets on all the plants-to-be, now that -- wipe the sweat off your brows, people -- nuclear power is going to save us from global warming!

Mandate watch

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The question of the day, of course, is What’s the Number? What percentage of the votes does Gavin Newsom get, and what does that mean?

The last time a mayor of San Francisco had such weak opposition was in 1983, when Dianne Feinstein ran all-but unopposed. It was a bleak time in the city, with the mayor openly selling the city to developers and the left lacking a contender who could take her on. Read more »

Election night parties

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Start the night off at the Bay Guardian’s “Don’t Dodge the Drafts” party at Doc’s Clock, 2575 Mission Street, between 21st and 22nd Streets, from 7-9 p.m. Music and drink specials for attendees who bring their “I voted” sticker or ballot stub.

Right next door at 12 Galaxies, mayoral candidate Chicken John Rinaldi will be throwing his “Loser’s Ball” election night party. Read more »

Mayor's race predictions

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"However many votes we get,we know the Bay Guardian will say it wasn't enough." That's what Mayor Gavin Newsom's campaign manager Eric Jaye said in the intro of today's C.W. Nevius column in the Chronicle, so I thought I might as well address it and get into the political prediction game. Read more »