Young, creative people who work hard

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I almost don't know what to say, except: Finally, someone admits it.

Rebecca Pederson, writing in The Bold Italic, explains why she actually likes the idea that San Francisco is becoming so expensive that thousands of longtime residents are being forced out; see, if it's more expensive to live here, then young, creative people will work harder:

People who want to make a living here from their creative work should have to hustle; it makes the successes much more meaningful.

Ah, yes. "Hustle." So all the older people who are, say, not trained in the tech field, or might be disabled and unable to "hustle," or the single parents who "hustle" all the goddam day just to keep the family together, or all the "creative" people who work for nonprofits or (gasp) are artists -- and trust me, they "hustle" as much as any tech worker ... they don't get to live here any more. Because

We can’t afford to walk barefoot around Golden Gate Park and write half-sonnets about trees. This city’s too expensive now.

I don't know anyone who thinks we still live in the Beat era. I don't know anyone who has ever written a half-sonnet about trees, and nobody with any sense of public health walks barefoot in Golden Gate Park. Get a clue.

But I do know a whole lot of people, including some who work for websites, who are seeing their lives and their community destroyed by rising prices -- which are due primarily to greed in the real-estate industry.

I don't think all tech workers are anywhere near as dumb as Rebecca Pederson, but I do see a lot of her attitude around: We are young and have money, and you are old and in the way. That's capitalism.

The "older people are losers" attitude was the worst part of the Sixties ethos (although disdain for labor -- often reciprocated by conservative unions -- was pretty bad, too.) This is a big city, with a diverse population. Not everyone is healthy and able to "hustle." Not everyone is young and carefree. Please, my friends: Have respect for the community you recently dropped into.

Yes, I was a San Francisco immigrant, too, in a different era, and I know things will always change, but I don't remember my young friends believing that they were by nature better and smarter than the people who already lived here. It's called respect.

 

 

Comments

PC? SF is looking evermore WASP-y... once agin.

Rock those chubbies and boat shoes like you got some of that slave trade money

-and no cultural memory

Posted by Guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 2:04 pm
Posted by Guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 2:19 pm

The current tech bubble will burst more explosively than that in 2000. Most ofl these "ideas" that the 20 somethings have that got millions in funding are cool but not financially sustainable. The start-up money quickly runs out when mismanaged and revenue streams are dry.

Posted by Guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 1:53 pm

lose their jobs will find another one. Market cycles do up and down, but life always goes on.

Posted by Guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 1:55 pm

In Austin, we're struggling with similar issues with many high-tech industry workers who are flocking here for jobs. Money talks – and we have to accept the boom as a double-edged sword. But ultimately I think we should be thankful that jobs exist in these markets, even if they are becoming competitive and expensive to a fault.

Posted by From TX on May. 22, 2013 @ 2:22 pm

problem. People love to whine and the grass is always greener on the other side.

Posted by Guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 2:43 pm

and you are just one person, I'm guessing, because your tone is so consistently self-congratulatory, small-minded, and arrogant. Anyhow,

I would like you to share your insipid flatness with an equally flat region of the country, say Kansas. Wait, nevermind, you pretty much abrogate your right to breathe the same air as the rest of us with your disrespect for people who are not exploiting other people (who you call "the successful") and who are more creative and interesting than you. I bet you are one of those pathetic people who consider, gasp, hipsters the biggest threat to your happiness, I mean your intense and pathetic self-regard.

Once you write a half-sonnet bemoaning your exile that doesn't entirely suck we'll consider letting you back on the planet.

Posted by Would like the d-bag posting as guest on May. 22, 2013 @ 7:18 pm

I can understand the annoyance of reading a newcomers wrongful critique of a city that you have a decade or more of experience in, and being insulted and reactionary.. But after reading this Rebecca Pederson's article.., I'm kind of in disbelief that you people are taking any of her statements seriously, or for that matter.., giving them any more consideration than a spiteful, lonely teenagers blog deserves..

I mean, for Christ's sake.., she even reveals the glaring lack in her "art experiences" of this great city. She was alone.., alone in Dolores Park... IN DOLORES PARK.., looking for artists to connect with.., in utter loneliness.

So basically she didn't have any friends when she moved here.., like most ppl that come from afar...., and she sorta half-heartedly looked for creative types.., all in the wrong places.., and figured she had it all deeply understood.

As an animator and artist who lived in SF for a decade, and someone who knows many fantastic musicians/artists there(i now live in Brooklyn), I can say with an absolute certainty.., that Dolores Park isn't the place to look..., and that great art.., maybe the greatest.., is often the most difficult to find.., Why?

Why are these artists so damned illusive, if they're so great? Why don't the most brilliant always top the charts? Because in order to be a good artist you have to be brutally, almost destructively, self-critical.. with an equally brutal work-ethic.. Which can result in something that many would consider powerful and important.., sadly being sidelined and never seen by a soul other than it's maker.

If you're looking for artists in Dolores Park.., or all your friends who are self-proclaimed artists give you the impression that we're all slackers who don't actually care about anything... who spend our dazing boozing and spreading STD's..
Then get the hell out there and meet cooler more creative people.., Whether or not they work in the tech industry is of no consequence.

Encourage the artists you see, don't be cynical assholes and tear them down behind their backs in abstract form.

Posted by Nate on May. 22, 2013 @ 9:02 pm

Seems like people are saying that if you work hard but don't make a lot of money, you don't actually contribute anything to the city. That's demented. It almost sounds like a parody of a conservative. I can only believe such an opinion is an exaggeration for troll purposes.

Posted by So what? on May. 22, 2013 @ 9:14 pm

and cannot command an income commensurate with a 21st century knowledge economy, then you might have to live in Oakland instead of SF.

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2013 @ 7:03 am

Instead of whining that they cannot afford what they cannot afford?

Posted by anon on May. 24, 2013 @ 7:23 am

Interesting how some of these posters find it so easy to take time out of their frantic daily "hustles" to comment on where complete strangers should and should not be allowed to live...

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2013 @ 1:18 pm

they are right and everyone else is wrong?

And along with that comes a self-appointed mandate to order people around and support an interventionist bureaucracy.

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2013 @ 1:27 pm

In the sixties, we used to say "Don't trust anyone over 30."

Now that we're in our sixties, we say "Don't trust anyone under 30."

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2013 @ 11:39 pm
Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2013 @ 7:22 am

Well, SF isn't really that creative any more, I found it definitely didn't live up to the hype. I lived out there a few years from 2008-2010 and I have to say I wasn't impressed by the amount of real creative stuff (writers/artists/filmmakers) were doing or the community compared to the cost of living. Pricewise, you'd be better off in NYC these days as there is far far more going on, exposure, and the price is negligible. LA is quite a bit cheaper, again more exposure. Chicago definitely has more going on, and cheaper. Even cities like Atlanta could have a case for it now because of affordability/exposure/community variables. DC and Philly can even make a case due to their burgeoning scenes and easy access to NYC by public transit for exposure. I don't consider "tech" as part of the "creative industries" at least not of the creative arts. Creative writers, performers, theaters, dancers, filmmakers, photographers, painters etc. SF is not that good for these people anymore, I mean yeah it's okay but it isn't this top city for creative expression it used to be. SF has become NYC, only much smaller with less opportunity.
Sure if you want to consider the programmers and what not as creative, SF will be great for you, but many people I know would delineate these categories. So before you blast my argument, consider the delineation.

Posted by jdizzzz on Jun. 09, 2013 @ 8:26 am

SF will remain a force in the creative arts if those who benefit from the tech economy become active patrons. As more resources find their way to the museums, galleries, theaters, and other arts venues, we are certain to have a thriving arts scene.

Posted by Guest on Jun. 09, 2013 @ 9:03 am

Far more interesting art and culture comes out of NY and LA, not to mention various European cities.

SF is well known for bad (sorry, I meant, "experimental") art. But, really, so what?

Posted by Guest on Jun. 09, 2013 @ 9:07 am

Basically she thinks prices should go up and people should be corporate sell outs and work and to give up on their dreams, at such a young age fresh out of college no less... for... Oh yeah, she didn't really get to that part. I realize my post above sounded negative and a I made a lot of good friends in SF but I don't take it back. I moved away for a cheaper cost of living where I could actually afford to do my artistic pursuits. Sure, it isn't as grand of a city as SF, but I don't have to work a grueling job just to pay the bills either, and people actually buy my stuff (and my gfs)
The people that make it "suffer" for many years. Most people I know that "stuck with it", didn't get sucked in to a particular city, had to move around, had to struggle, maybe had to leave the country and volunteer for a bit, took temp jobs or did waiting tables and what not, but then magically at around 30 or so start breaking through, developing their craft and having successful artistic careers. I kind of feel bad she gave up so easily or maybe she realized she just wasn't that talented?

Posted by jdizzzz on Jun. 09, 2013 @ 8:58 am

I was going to move out of my 3 bedroom Noe/Mission rent controlled apartment in a couple of months. But after reading this it's become clear to me that I need to stick around so I'm not replaced by a naive, self-righteous asshole.

Posted by Guest on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 3:09 pm

I'm an older guy - hippie from the 70's - and am one of the "mature creative types". Today a run three successful websites using the blood, sweat and tears of the young and creative types. The internet is crawling with then and they're hiring for a dime a dozen.

Every day there are more and more even talented young types and they will work for a pittance. They are hustling and competing with each other. I hire them to perform complicated tech-tasks (complicated for me not them) and pay them 8 to $10/hr.

I'm happy to say that now that I'm 50 I can sit back and let the kids do all the hustling.

Posted by Guest on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 6:22 am

You have to shit on the sidewalk to be a valued human in San Francisco

Posted by Guest on Dec. 17, 2013 @ 9:39 am

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