Film Features

You have the right to remain weird

Programmers from LA, Austin, and (duh) SF bring cult madness to the Roxie

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

FILM It's not easy being a repertory cinema these days, even when you're the coolest (or only, or both) one in town. Hoping that this town is big enough for more than just one, at least for a few days, the Roxie this weekend is hosting a kind of cult cinema smackdown between itself and two more of the nation's finest such emporiums. Under the blanket title "Cinemadness!," the three-day marathon of rarities, oddities, and unbilled surprises challenges you to look away, or stay away — either way, your sanity will surely be shakier come Monday.Read more »

Pamalot

The divine Ms. Grier is coming to the Castro!

|
(0)

cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Say the name "Pam Grier" and certain things come to mind: the iconic poster for her 1973 breakout, Coffy, about a nurse turned vigilante ("the baddest one-chick hit squad that ever hit town!"); or her cool-as-ice, career-reviving turn in 1997's Jackie Brown.Read more »

Where there's a Will

The comedian tries something old (nudity!) and something new (Spanish dialogue) in Casa de mi Padre

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

FILM You gotta love a guy who is willing to poke fun at his man handles. But the consistency with which Will Ferrell is willing to drop trou has had even Terry Gross wondering, what's with the vast expanses of exposed carne asada, dude?

Ferrell's new Casa de mi Padre — a Spanish-language jab at telenovelas, spaghetti-burrito westerns, and just plain low-budget moviemaking, circa the early 1970s — is no exception. It, er, climaxes with a sweet, sweet love scene, complete with close-ups on rumps.Read more »

Here's lookin' at you, kids

San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival's youth revolution: now with breakdancing, party-rocking, and pint-sized ninja stars. Plus, film critic Cheryl Eddy's SFIAAFF picks

|
(1)

Awesome explosion

Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim get a billion to make a movie — and promptly blow it all — in Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie.

|
(0)

FILM It's almost impossible to describe Adult Swim hit Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!, but "cable access on acid" comes pretty close. It's awkward, gross, repetitive, and quotable; it features unsettling characters portrayed by famous comedians and unknowns who may not actually be actors. Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim, who are much more low-key than the amplified versions of themselves they play on the show and in the new Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie, discussed the spoils of cult fame the morning after a recent screening in San Francisco.Read more »

Dame good fun

Seedy delights from the 1930s sleaze up the Roxie in "Hollywood Before the Code: Nasty-Ass Films for a Nasty-Ass World" 

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

FILM What with the internet, the paparazzi, Rupert Murdoch's CIA-level spy techniques, and the general displacement of actual news by "celebrity news," it's pretty hard these days for a star of any sort to keep their debauchery private. Not like the good old days, when Hollywood carefully stage-managed publicity and only those who'd become a real liability risked having their peccadilloes exposed.Read more »

Back to the Point

Kevin Epps updates his seminal 2001 documentary hit with Straight Outta Hunters Point 2

|
(1)

cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM "It's highly probable that no one but Kevin Epps could have made a film like Straight Outta Hunters Point," begins Erik K. Arnold's 2001 Guardian article. Epps, then a 33-year-old first-time filmmaker, had just released his bold documentary; it investigated a neighborhood that most San Francisco residents never actually visited, but knew about thanks to news coverage of its prodigious gang violence.Read more »

Living the green dream

Conservation (and good storytelling) inspire Ann and Steve Dunsky

|
(1)

FILM Bay Area filmmakers Steve and Ann Dunsky (2005's The Greatest Good) have a pair of documentaries making waves right now: Green Fire, about conservationist Aldo Leopold, which plays at the upcoming San Francisco Green Film Festival; and Butterflies and Bulldozers, an exploration of the decades-long fight to save San Bruno Mountain. Bulldozers screened at the 2011 Green Film Festival, and has a coveted slot amid the 20th anniversary programming at Washington, D.C.'s Environmental Film Festival later this spring. Read more »

Success in excess

Is Ken Russell's awesome "The Devils" Satan's favorite movie? Sure, why the hell not.

|
(2)

FILM The demise of Ken Russell late last year at age 84 blew a few cobwebs off appreciation of his career, which had ever been beloved by cult-minded buffs but forgotten by most everyone else for some years. He hadn't had a theatrical feature for two decades, and in his last years had been reduced to glorified home movies with titles like Revenge of the Elephant Man (2004) and The Fall of the Louse of Usher (2002). Read more »

No country

"Bros Before Hos" tackles the rough business of being a man

|
(0)

FILM "The male stereotype makes masculinity not just a fact of biology but something that must be proved and re-proved, a continual quest for an ever-receding Holy Grail," wrote Marc Feigen Fasteau in The Male Machine, a 1975 Gloria Steinem-approved polemic (she wrote the introduction) that attempted to catalyze American men into joining their sisters in the women's movement in reexamining and casting off traditional gender roles.Read more »