Film Features

To the extreme

The Roxie offers a megadose of J-horror master Sion Sono

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TRASH In the West we've basically known two kinds of Japanese cinema. One is that of Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and their inheritors — somber, formal, detailed. The other is the cinema of crazy shit: gangster and "pink" movies from the 1960s onward, cracked visionaries from Seijun Suzuki to Takashi Miike, the exercises in tongue-in-cheek fanboy excess like Tokyo Gore Police (2008) and Big Man Japan (2007).Read more »

Desolation angels

The Pacific Film Archive surveys the melancholy masterpieces of '70s American cinema

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Open mouth, insert popcorn

FALL ARTS PREVIEW: Hollywood's big movies are big

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FALL ARTS Supporters of the cinema-industrial complex know that fall is, arguably, the primo time to catch a flick. As the days get shorter, the award hopefuls roll out faster. Of course, there's some non-Oscar contenders worth noting as well, and I don't just mean A Very Harold and Kumar 3D Christmas (pass the dutchie Nov. 9). Here's a sprinkling of high- and lowlights to look forward to. All dates are subject to change. Read more »

Reps rule

FALL ARTS PREVIEW: What's not coming to a megaplex near you

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FALL ARTS In 2010, I wrote a long piece on what Hollywood had in store for fall, and relegated rep houses to a shorter sidebar. But after a summer which produced exactly one truly great wide release (that'd be Attack the Block), and eye-bleeding amounts of unnecessary 3D, a switcheroo seemed only fair.Read more »

Deep in the heart

One Day's Lone Scherfig directs an uncommon rom-com

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Why do romantic comedies get such a bad rap? Blame it on the lame set-up, the contrived hurdles artificially buttressed by the obligatory chorus of BFFs, the superficial something-for-every-demographic-with-ADD multinarrative, and the implausible resolutions topped by something as simple as a kiss or as conventional as marriage, but often no deeper, more crafted, or heartfelt than an application of lip gloss.Read more »

Whose voice?

Deborah Kaufman and Alan Snitow explore how American Jews view Israel in Between Two Worlds

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM In 1981 Deborah Kaufman founded the nation's first Jewish Film Festival in San Francisco. Thirteen years later, with similar festivals burgeoning in the wake of SFJFF's success — there are now over a hundred around the globe — she left the festival to make documentaries of her own with life partner and veteran local TV producer Alan Snitow.Read more »

Over the edge

Two films about madness at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival

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The nonconformist

A retrospective (of new prints!) traces Bernardo Bertolucci's 50-year career

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Dearly beloved

Before her appearance at the Castro Theatre, Apollonia speaks of Prince and Purple Rain

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Pop historians have praised Prince's 1984 Purple Rain as the greatest soundtrack of all time, the greatest album of the 1980s, and even the greatest album (full stop) of all time. Fans agree — the Oscar-winning platter has sold more than 13 million copies.Read more »

Sing out

Musicals take center stage at Frameline 35

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