Film Features

No talking

Vintage stars shine at Silent Winter

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM The 2013 San Francisco Silent Film Festival isn't until July, but the fest's Silent Winter offshoot offers a day packed full of classic delights to tide over its legions of fans until summer. The Castro Theatre plays host to four features and one shorts program, all of which boast live musical accompaniment.Read more »

Heat of the moment

Local retrospectives spotlight Japan's innovative Art Theater Guild

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My campy Valentine

Fall in love with vampires, acid, severed hands, and interplanetary war at the Vortex Room

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FILM Love is the drug, or so sang somebody once. Yet violent conflict has always been a more predominatingly addicting factor in movies — which is why it seems both natural and despairing that the Vortex Room's "For Your Vortex Only" celebration of "Love...Vortex Style" (please guys, only one title per series), every Thursday in February, features eight vintage movies in which "love" is less a matter of romantic fulfillment than a titular selling point.Read more »

Muppets, manholes, and mayhem

Local filmmakers screen eyepopping shorts at IndieFest

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Vincent Gargiulo is originally from Stockton and lives in San Francisco, but I spoke with him over the phone from Duluth, Minn., where he's about to start filming his latest project, Duluth is Horrible. "So far, it's actually lovely," he admits. "But Duluth is Lovely, nobody wants to watch that movie."Read more »

Weird tales

Filmmaker Don Coscarelli on Elvis, Bigfoot, and 'John Dies at the End'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM It was a particular thrill to talk to Don Coscarelli on Jan. 8 — Elvis' birthday. He is, after all, the guy who made 2002's Bubba Ho-Tep, which imagined an elderly version of the King fighting the evil mummy that's menacing his nursing home. Coscarelli's other credits include 1979's Phantasm (and its 1988, '94, and '98 sequels), 1982's The Beastmaster, and his latest: supernatural noir buddy comedy John Dies at the End, based on David Wong's comedy-horror novel.Read more »

Triumph of the Wiener Dog

Indie icon Heather Matarazzo talks 'Welcome to the Dollhouse'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Everyone's got a little Dawn Wiener in them. Dressed in deceptively cheerful floral prints, the tweenage heroine of 1995's Welcome to the Dollhouse trudges through the hell that is junior high, where cruel bullies lurk in the girls' room ("Why do you hate me?" "Because you're ugly"), the cafeteria is full of cold shoulders and catty cheerleaders, and parents and teachers just don't understand.Read more »

Old joy -- and pain

San Francisco filmmaker (and Oscar nominee!) Sari Gilman talks 'Kings Point'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Film editor Sari Gilman — her resume includes 2007's Ghosts of Abu Ghraib and 2002's Blue Vinyl — made her directorial debut with the 30-minute documentary Kings Point, a bittersweet exploration of a Florida retirement community. The film first screened locally as part of the 2012 San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, and will air on HBO in March. In the meantime, it's been nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Short. I caught up with Gilman to talk about her film — and little gold men.Read more »

Damnation investigation

A new doc goes to hell and back

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM It's a peculiarity of our moment that the worse things get, the more people seem inclined to think everyone else is going to hell. Their interpretation of the Bible (or Quran, or whatever) is seemingly absolute, yet God seems to stay on their side no matter which way the worldly wind might blow. Righteous judgment of others has practically become the American way, not that we were ever less than an opinionated bunch.Read more »

Hardly strictly British

Classics, premieres, and a 2013 Oscar nominee at the Mostly British Film Festival

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM "In Somalia there are no such things as kid actors and stage moms," explains the trailer for Asad, an 18-minute film about a Somali boy forced to choose between fishing and piracy. "There are just survivors telling a story."Read more »

Nero worship

The original 'Django' rides again at the Castro

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Though it's much more a Southern than a Western — closer to Mandingo (1975) than Red River (1948), that's for sure — Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained nonetheless pays specific homage to spaghetti westerns in its title and some stylistic fillips.Read more »