Film Features

Fall Arts: Popcorn -- and human pies

Fresh Coppola and eternal winter in a fall new-movie top 10
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1. Across the Universe Stage visionary (The Lion King) turned occasional film director (Titus, Frida) Julie Taymor's latest attracted advance attention of the wrong kind. Revolution Studios found her final cut of this Vietnam War–<\d>era musical drama — whose characters break into Beatles songs — too surreal and abstract, reediting it without her consent. Read more »

Faithfully unfaithful

Love and friendship in Melville's Le Doulos
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The world of Jean-Pierre Melville's Le Doulos (a.k.a. The Stoolie, 1963) is an incredibly complicated one. Perhaps this has to do with the fact that its inhabitants are ex-cons, petty thieves, snitches, and ambiguous lovers, all of whom are as loyal as they're unfaithful. Or maybe the complexity emerges from the strong sense of honor and morality that these underground characters share.

Maurice (Serge Reggiani), a robber, is sent to prison because somebody snitches on him. He's willing to believe that it was his best friend, Silien (Jean-Paul Belmondo), who betrayed him. Read more »

Arcade fire

Who is the true King of Kong?
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cheryl@sfbg.com

"That ape is very cunning, and he will do what he needs to, to stop you." This nugget of wisdom, tossed off by a spectator who's hoping to witness a record-setting Donkey Kong score, is at once simple and poignant — much like The King of Kong, which chronicles the rivalry between two of the game's elite players, both men in their 30s who take the pursuit of arcade excellence very, very seriously. Read more »

New! Odd! Fantastic!

Dead Channels film fest goes Postal
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Cheryl@sfbg.com

Rampaging genitalia, families of half-wits, towns shielding deadly secrets, and the end of the world — yep, there are good times to be had with the selection of new films in Dead Channels: The San Francisco Festival of Fantastic Film. The most buzzed-about title, Uwe Boll's Postal (it's a war-on-terror comedy that pokes fun at Sept. 11, among other topics; Seinfeld's Soup Nazi plays fun guy Osama bin Laden), wasn't available for prescreening. Read more »

Two great cult movies

Out of the past and into the Dead Channels film fest
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Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (John Newland, US, 1973). As Grindhouse viewers or true grindhouse aficionados know, starting a title with Don't was once a popular way to strike fear in sleazoids. The fact that Don't Be Afraid of the Dark was made for TV would suggest it's tame — that is, if the Don't era didn't coincide with the glory, rather than gory, days of frightening TV movies. In fact, this little number is at least as great as Dan Curtis's 1975 Trilogy of Terror, with which it shares some knee-high shocks while being much less campy. Read more »

Iron curtain in outer space

To the moon (or not quite) and back with "Russian Fantastik Cinema"
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Throughout its history, the Soviet Union felt like the final frontier to many Americans. What was happening on the other side of that iron curtain? The Russians wondered too. Since travel between the countries was so limited, their inhabitants often had to turn for information to the cultural products that made it — both ways — past Russia's gatekeepers. How better to hide meaning than in fairy tales and outer space? Read more »

Holiest of holies

David Wain preaches the virtues of The Ten
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If you've seen the late, great MTV sketch comedy show The State (look for the long-awaited DVD in October) or 2001's summer-camp-movie parody Wet Hot American Summer, you can imagine what the Bible's gonna look like in the hands of director David Wain. Or maybe not — in The Ten, Wain and cowriter Ken Marino interpret the 10 Commandments with typically off-the-wall (and thus completely unpredictable) humor. I recently spoke with Wain, who doesn't fancy himself the next Cecil B. Read more »

The closer you get

The deeper mysteries of Abbas Kiarostami's films become apparent
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How does one begin to write about Abbas Kiarostami's Close-Up (1990), a film as layered as an onion? I remember that when I first watched it, I felt touched by what I then perceived to be its affectionate ending. Read more »

Church of Santino

The man who stole Project Runway discusses fabulous fashion in film
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johnny@sfbg.com

It's no surprise that Santino Rice knows how to serve up a good quote. Read more »

Let there be light

Sunshine ruminates on solar power
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cheryl@sfbg.com

Remember that old Twilight Zone episode in which the earth and the sun got way too close for comfort? The twist was that the feverish protagonist had actually dreamed the hellish heat wave — and our shivering planet was drifting away from the sun instead. Another deep freeze awaits the human race in Sunshine, which imagines that the sun has begun to die billions of years before its expiration date. Read more »