Film Features

Silent voice

His People opens the movie screen to Jewish American dreams
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When US moviemaking started out, it was an enterprise disreputable enough to attract the wrong sort of people: get-rich-quick speculators, third-tier theater folk, organized crime, and even — god forbid — Jews. The last rose to pilot most major studios as Hollywood became a gigantic industry. Yet this alleged Jewish mafia (a term still not fully retired in some circles) seldom used wealth and imagistic power to integrate fellow Jews into the cultural mainstream. Read more »

Welcome (back) to the jungle

Werner Herzog revisits Dieter Dengler's great escape
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cheryl@sfbg.com

Early in Rescue Dawn, Werner Herzog's narrative retooling of his 1997 doc Little Dieter Needs to Fly, a group of pilots aboard an aircraft carrier watches an instructional reel on jungle survival. They're young and cocky, and since this is 1966, the Vietnam War still seems entirely impossible. Read more »

Ephemera, etc.

Sifting through the Silent Film Fest's treasures
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Technology induces unrealistic leaps of optimism, and so it was that usually reliable New York Times film critic A.O. Read more »

Notes on Nazimova

From Stanislavski to Hollywood Babylon with a silent-film star
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Audiences at this year's San Francisco Silent Film Festival will be treated to several strong roles for leading women — Lois Wilson's heartbreaking humble pie as Miss Lulu Bett (1921), Louise Brooks's gender-bending hobo in 1928's Beggars of Life — but now as then, there can be only one Nazimova. Read more »

Midnight movie memories

A brief, hazy, and far-from-official SF history
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CHRISTIAN BRUNO In the mid-'60s the Presidio hosted Underground Cinema 12, a package of late-night movies that might incorporate a little [George] Kuchar, a little Busby Berkeley, and a lot of porn posing as art. It was a traveling package of films that was curated by Mike Getz out of LA, but the Presidio put its own SF (which usually meant gay) stamp on things.

KAREN LARSEN Gosh, I remember going to see the Cockettes at the Palace in North Beach in the '60s. Read more »

Late Night Picture Show

Clay Theatre hits its midnight stride
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Midnight Mass, held at the Bridge Theatre, may be the sparkling, dressed-to-the-nines jewel in Landmark Theatres' cult-movie crown. But with a newly invigorated programming focus, the Clay's Late Night Picture Show (and its aimed-more-at-college-kids Berkeley equivalent, the Shattuck's Midnight Special) is also holding it down for folks who're willing to sacrifice their sleep in the name of offbeat cinema. Read more »

The new midnight

Will The Thrill will thrill you at Thrillville
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"Nine p.m. is the new midnight," declares Will "the Thrill" Viharo, programmer and host of Thrillville, the East Bay's giant cocktail shaker of B-movie bliss. Turns out Thrillville's earliest incarnation was as the Midnight Lounge, which Viharo first oversaw in April 1997, just a few months after Oakland's Parkway Speakeasy Theater opened. After a particularly scorching Elvis tribute event, Viharo decided his gig, eventually dubbed Thrillville, was ready for prime time. Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
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The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »