Film Features

Oh TV, up yours!

Animal Charm, Bryan Boyce, and TV Carnage chart the outer limits of piracy
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johnny@sfbg.com
Dick Cheney surveys the teeming white crowds at the 2004 Republican National Convention. With their Cheney Rocks! placards and stars-and-stripes Styrofoam hats, these people worship him, but he still looks like he wants to spray them with buckshot. "You're all a bunch of fucking assholes!" he sneers. "You know why? Read more »

Gregg the Ripper

A talk with the man behind the sampled sounds of Girl Talk
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You're walking down the street in the dark. You can hear the steps of a beast with many feet behind you. Every second it's getting closer and bigger. One minute it's got the juicy spirit of a young Biggie Smalls and a waterfall piano melody that inspires visions of a tiny dancer. The next, its Ciara-stamped "O" pulses over the metric bump and grind of an Elastica connection. Just when you think you have its ID down, it changes again, shifting sounds and songs at a rate of a dozen a minute. It's tapping you on the shoulder. It's gotten inside your brain. Read more »

American lie

This Film Is Not Yet Rated investigates Jack Valenti’s legacy
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johnny@sfbg.com
One of the many refreshing aspects of Kirby Dick's This Film Is Not Yet Rated is that it doesn't focus on an obvious topic. Documentaries have begun reaching more viewers in recent years, but few take on the many-fangled foibles of the Bush era in an imaginative manner. Dick's new film does, in addition to providing a lesson about the intersection between film history and American history, a convergence that isn't as petty or easily dismissed as one might think. This is a smartly comedic private-eye movie with a feminist, even lesbian sensibility. Read more »

Basehead of the class

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Low-key yet brutal, Half Nelson is exactly the kind of movie Hollywood will never make. Notably, it's entirely cliché free. There's no deliverance for Dan Dunne (Ryan Gosling), an eighth-grade teacher whose raging crack habit is steadily taking over his life. There's no real turnaround for 13-year-old Drey (Shareeka Epps), one of Dan's students who's being eyeballed for drug-delivery service by the neighborhood dealer, Frank (Anthony Mackie). Read more »

Pedro's progress

An incomplete retrospective charts Almodóvar's shift from outrage to profundity
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Poor Generalissimo Franco, not yet dead a decade before the Spanish film industry he'd so carefully censored gained its new leading tastemaker: a plump, girly homo fond of gender blur, anticlericalism, and nuclear-family meltdowns. Twenty-two years have passed since What Have I Done to Deserve This? Read more »

VIDIOT'S DELIGHT

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With the simultaneous advent of personal computers and video games on a massive scale in the early ’80s, it was unsurprising that Hollywood tried to fit all things virtual into the exploitable framework of cheesy teen comedies. The latest Midnites for Maniacs triple bill reprises three of the era's daffier such efforts.
The eccentric Heartbeeps, a major flop released in 1981, puts Andy Kaufman and Bernadette Peters in constrictingly ingenious makeup as two servant robots who run away from their factory warehouse in the brave new world of 1995. Read more »

The slither king

Snakes on a Plane wrangler Jules Sylvester sssspeaks!
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cheryl@sfbg.com
Meet the individual who just may be the coolest cat in America right now — snake handler Jules Sylvester, the guy responsible for charming winning performances out of Samuel L. Jackson's fork-tongue costars in Snakes on a Plane. Read more »

LIFE IS SHORT

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In its almost 27 minutes, Samantha Reynolds's Back to Life doesn't break down the history of taxidermy, but it does prod, stumble, and finesse its way into some memorably off-kilter portraiture, not to mention insight about mortality. Her decision to be on camera initially might seem amateurish (especially after the movie's opening animation), but as a surrogate viewer, she achieves an uncomfortable intimacy with her subjects. And her subjects are something else. Read more »

Fifteen, minute

Quinceañera celebrates details that summer blockbusters miss
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
The sweet 16 has nothing on your average quinceañera, a celebration of reaching womanhood at age 15 that has roots in ancient Aztec civilization and is a tradition still very much alive throughout the Americas. Read more »

Found in translation

John Byrum revisits The Razor's Edge and Bill Murray's dramatic debut
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
In early ’80s Hollywood, director John Byrum set about making a film set in ’20s Paris. Coming down from the nouveau bohemian high of filming 1980's Heart Beat, a film based on Carolyn Cassidy's accounts of Jack Kerouac, Byrum was fully prepared to tickle the underbelly of the poetic avant-garde. He aimed to do so through a film version of W. Somerset Maugham's The Razor's Edge.
The Razor's Edge tells the story of Larry Darrell, a young American who has just returned from war and decided to loaf around Paris to find the meaning of his life. Read more »