Film Review

Geek love

Edgar Wright brings a cult comic to the big screen

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The kids aren't alright

Todd Solondz provokes (again) with Life During Wartime

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM The Kids Are Alright isn't the only film this summer that subtly skewers the suburban upper-middle class by following a seemingly well-adjusted family as they're thrown into crisis when a shadowy father figure attempts to enter their orbit. Only in the case of Todd Solondz's Life During Wartime, instead of a sperm donor, Dad is a convicted child molester.Read more »

Close-up

Great Directors: a vanity project worth admiring

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Everybody's a curator, providing one or more terrain maps of their personality. What's more telling, or potentially damning, than looking over someone's iPod playlist or CD collection? My Detroit best-friend freshman roommates were first encountered pawing through my LP crate, diagnosing just what sort of hick they'd been stuck with. (Between the Sex Pistols and Dan Fogelberg, they were highly confused.) Read more »

666-ZOMB

Spanish import [Rec] 2 resuscitates a genre that won't die

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Yes, vampires and werewolves are getting pretty dang tired lately.

Yet even they haven't risked getting so overexposed as our shuffling undead friends.Read more »

Riot awakening

Stonewall Uprising documents a landmark moment for queer civil rights

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FILM On the night of June 28, 1969, police embarked on what they thought would be a routine raid on a gay bar in New York's Greenwich Village, the sleazy, Mafia-run Stonewall Inn. The ensuing three days of rioting — during which mostly young men and drag queens accustomed to being marginalized and hauled off to jail stood their ground and fought back — became what historian Lillian Faderman has called "the shot heard round the world" for LGBT activism: a spontaneous expression of street-level outrage that fueled the birth of a movement.Read more »

We are family

The Kids Are All Right's (non)traditional comedy

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arts@sfbg.com

>>Read Louis Peitzman's complete interview with director Lisa Chodolenko here

FILM In many ways, The Kids Are All Right is a straightforward family dramedy: it's about parents trying to do what's best for their children and struggling to keep their relationship together. But it's also a film in which Jules (Julianne Moore) goes down on Nic (Annette Bening) while they're watching gay porn.Read more »

Madam majesty

Helen Mirren rules in Love Ranch

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"Who do you think you are, the queen of fucking England?"

That's Joe Pesci to Helen Mirren in Love Ranch, a film that takes Mirren about as far as possible from her titular role in 2006's The Queen. She stars as Grace Botempo, co-owner of Nevada's first legal brothel alongside her husband, Pesci's Charlie. The fact that the regal British dame is entirely convincing as an American madam speaks to her impressive versatility.Read more »

Nobody but you

Everyone Else thunders with a relationship's troubled interior

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Space is the place

Another Science Fiction is brought to the page and screen by Megan Prelinger

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LIT/FILM "I'm a lifelong space fan old enough to remember the Apollo era and grow up on Star Trek — when I was little, the Apollo missions and Star Trek merged in my mind," says Megan Prelinger. "I lived my life, but kept one eye on space, watching and waiting to see what would happen. As I got older I realized that the general public is disenfranchised from having an opinion about or experience of space. I thought I could make an intervention — an intervention into space."Read more »

New York story

Do the right thing? Please Give examines the everyday agonies of liberal guilt

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FILM The central characters in Nicole Holofcener's new film, Please Give, Manhattan couple Kate (Catherine Keener) and Alex (Oliver Platt), display a fluency in the language of large round numbers that is occasionally disturbed by bouts of self-inflicted sticker shock. Read more »