Film Review

Notes on Nazimova

From Stanislavski to Hollywood Babylon with a silent-film star
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Audiences at this year's San Francisco Silent Film Festival will be treated to several strong roles for leading women — Lois Wilson's heartbreaking humble pie as Miss Lulu Bett (1921), Louise Brooks's gender-bending hobo in 1928's Beggars of Life — but now as then, there can be only one Nazimova. Read more »

Midnight movie memories

A brief, hazy, and far-from-official SF history
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CHRISTIAN BRUNO In the mid-'60s the Presidio hosted Underground Cinema 12, a package of late-night movies that might incorporate a little [George] Kuchar, a little Busby Berkeley, and a lot of porn posing as art. It was a traveling package of films that was curated by Mike Getz out of LA, but the Presidio put its own SF (which usually meant gay) stamp on things.

KAREN LARSEN Gosh, I remember going to see the Cockettes at the Palace in North Beach in the '60s. Read more »

Late Night Picture Show

Clay Theatre hits its midnight stride
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Midnight Mass, held at the Bridge Theatre, may be the sparkling, dressed-to-the-nines jewel in Landmark Theatres' cult-movie crown. But with a newly invigorated programming focus, the Clay's Late Night Picture Show (and its aimed-more-at-college-kids Berkeley equivalent, the Shattuck's Midnight Special) is also holding it down for folks who're willing to sacrifice their sleep in the name of offbeat cinema. Read more »

The new midnight

Will The Thrill will thrill you at Thrillville
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"Nine p.m. is the new midnight," declares Will "the Thrill" Viharo, programmer and host of Thrillville, the East Bay's giant cocktail shaker of B-movie bliss. Turns out Thrillville's earliest incarnation was as the Midnight Lounge, which Viharo first oversaw in April 1997, just a few months after Oakland's Parkway Speakeasy Theater opened. After a particularly scorching Elvis tribute event, Viharo decided his gig, eventually dubbed Thrillville, was ready for prime time. Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
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The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnight Mass

The queen of midnight movies in SF: Peaches Christ
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

The funniest line in movie history didn't pass from the lips of Addison DeWitt in All About Eve (1950), Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934), or Alvy Singer in Annie Hall (1977). Read more »

Midnight Movie memories

A brief, hazy, and far from official SF history
|
()

CHRISTIAN BRUNO In the mid-'60s the Presidio hosted Underground Cinema 12, a package of late-night movies that might incorporate a little [George] Kuchar, a little Busby Berkeley, and a lot of porn posing as art. It was a traveling package of films that was curated by Mike Getz out of LA, but the Presidio put its own SF (which usually meant gay) stamp on things.

KAREN LARSEN Gosh, I remember going to see the Cockettes at the Palace in North Beach in the '60s. Read more »

Midnight Specialists: Midnites For Maniacs

The king of midnight movies in SF: Jesse Hawthorne Ficks
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cheryl@sfbg.com

Ask Jesse Hawthorne Ficks what his favorite movie is, and he won't hesitate: it's Ski School. Ficks, who programs and hosts the Castro Theatre's monthly Midnites for Maniacs triple feature, interprets "favorite" literally: the 1991 raunch-com might not surface on any highbrow top-10 lists, but it's likely no scholar loves Citizen Kane (1941) as much as Ficks loves Ski School.

"I've always been upset with people who talk about guilty pleasures," Ficks explained when I paid him a visit at the Ninth Street Film Center. Read more »

Ball of fire

In praise of Barbara Stanwyck
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SINGULAR SIREN Sam Fuller, known for being one of the toughest mugs in Hollywood, wrote of casting Barbara Stanwyck as the matriarchal sexpot in his whacked-out 1957 western Forty Guns, "She was ready to do whatever you needed, even if it meant falling off her horse and being dragged along the ground." That Stanwyck was already 50 when she commanded this attention gives a sense of her fearsome robustness, something that held movie audiences in thrall for the better part of three decades.

A question inevitably surfaces in watching the greatest hits that dot the cen Read more »