Film Review

Night on Earth

A new 35mm print of Gus van Sant's Mala Noche
|
(0)

Gus van Sant's films are as thick as the Oregon sky. Swept with dreamy remove and elliptical narration, his work strikes me as being the cinematic equivalent of shoegaze music (sorry, Sofia). Now that the writer-director seems to have given up middlebrow commercial filmmaking (Good Will Hunting, Finding Forrester) to return to the art house (Elephant, Last Days), it feels like the right time for a revival of his shoestring 16mm debut, Mala Noche. Read more »

No scrubs

Can Sicko cure our health care system?
|
(0)

cheryl@sfbg.com

Michael Moore is a divisive character, but he's not the most controversial man in the United States. The first image in Sicko, the director's first doc since 2004's Fahrenheit 9/11, is of George W. Bush. But the liar in chief is only one of Moore's targets this time around. In Sicko he goes after America's entire health care system, examining how even folks who have health insurance are routinely screwed over by corporations that care more about profits than lives. Read more »

Cemetery gates

The hills are dead, but the music is alive in Colma: The Musical
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Perhaps the only nonzombie movie in recent memory in which the dead outnumber the living, Colma: The Musical did not appear to be a hot prospect when it premiered at last year's San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival. A musical suburban-youth angstfest made locally on a shoestring, starring and produced by no one you've heard of? A movie originally intended to be an indie concept album and a stage show? Read more »

Suburban stasis

Dead-end streets are fertile ground for the makers of Colma: The Musical
|
(0)

Colma is not Daly City. Apparently I'm the only San Franciscan who's failed to comprehend the pronounced distinctions between these neighboring municipalities, outside the selection of merch at their respective Target stores. Daly City has Serramonte Center and the rows of houses made famous by Malvina Reynolds's anthem to architectural sameness, "Little Boxes" (the song that opens Showtime's fabulous stoned-in-suburbia sitcom, Weeds). Read more »

The Muppets take San Francisco

It's time to play the music, it's time to light the lights
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Be warned: the following is in no way a professional, measured critique of the career and oeuvre of one Jim Henson, master puppeteer, kiddie empire creator, and upcoming Yerba Buena Center for the Arts retrospective honoree. Oh, no. Below are the semicoherent ravings of a Muppet-philiac Henson fangirl. Read more »

Singin' and shillin' with the Muppets

"Menah menah" anyone?
|
(0)

I had a revelation while watching Muppets Music Moments: Statler and Waldorf are the reasons I became a film critic. As a li'l Muppet-freaked kid in the late '70s and early '80s, I lived for their curmudgeonly peanut-gallery zingers. Read more »

Club sprockets

Nightlife hits the movie screen at Frameline
|
(0)

This year's Frameline is bursting with documentaries about legendary nightlife personalities. Call it the Party Monster effect. Read more »

Night of 1,000 sexploits

A Q&A with lezsploitation maven Michelle Johnson
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Sexually repressed nuns, naughty prisoners, lustful wardens, and love-thirsty vampires are the celebrated heroines of Triple X Selects: The Best of Lezsploitation, Michelle Johnson's effort to reappropriate 1960s and 1970s sexploitation flicks. Intrigued by these films' soundtracks, the Los Angeles DJ, musician, and cult-film enthusiast hunted for the genre's most precious gems and compiled them into a 47-minute metafilm. Read more »

For Christ's sake

LGBT folk vs. Christians
|
(0)

The cultural divide between a supposed gay agenda and faith-based biases is well represented in several features within Frameline's expansive 2007 program. Read more »