Literature

Eat, pray, defend chick lit

Elizabeth Gilbert isn't as lame as you think

|
(1)

caitlin@sfbg.com

LIT I read Eat, Pray Love a while ago, and I'm nervous to tell you that I liked it. Ever since bottle blonde Julia Roberts assumed her best worried-kitten face for the book's film version, no self-respecting lit snob would ever admit to having enjoyed Elizabeth Gilbert's account of her year of finances-be-damned travel, healing from divorce, and fulminations on the belabored pursuit of love.Read more »

Page street

YEAR IN LIT: A small assortment of Bay Area book highlights from 2010

|
(0)

Rebecca Solnit's Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas (University of California Press, 158 pages, $24.95) is one of the best ideas a writer has come up with in a long time. By combining private and public support, Solnit was able to give away portions of the atlas in full-color, full-spread map handouts. (My favorite tracked both famous/infamous queer public spaces and the migration of butterflies throughout the city.). Read more »

Mirrors and masks

In praise of the art book during a Kindle era

|
(0)

Nan on Jean

WRITERS ISSUE: Bay Times "Straight Talk" columnist Nan Parks reviews the first book by the Onion's Jean Teasdale

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

WRITERS ISSUE So this is my very first book review ever (!) unless you count the book review I had to do in school on The Yearling, so bear with me because I'm a beginner. But anyway the title of the book is A Book of Jean's Own (St. Martin's Griffin, 288 pages, $14.99) and the author is Jean Teasdale who lives in an apartment somewhere with her husband Rick and her two cats, one was named Garfield which I'm guessing she took from the comic strip and I forget the name of her other cat. You'll find out if you read her book!Read more »

It's not easy being an arrogant know-it-all

WRITERS ISSUE: An excerpt from The International Homosexual Conspiracy

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

WRITERS ISSUE Having to constantly suffer the company of the ignorant, it's difficult to suppress my condescension. After all, I know about obscure music and books that few others know of and this makes me superior.Read more »

Moving portraits

WRITERS ISSUE: Left in the Dark illuminates San Francisco's movie-going past

|
(0)

They're back!

WRITERS ISSUE: Armistead Maupin catches us up on the girls in Mary Ann in Autumn

|
(1)

Lost city

WRITERS ISSUE: Peter Plate's Elegy Written on a Crowded Street stares into the Market Street abyss

|
(2)

Past presence

Simon Reynolds sounds off about the music of hauntology

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

LIT/MUSIC/VISUAL ART A present from the past — the paradox within that phrase is as close as one might get to pithily describing hauntology. The term was coined in 1993 by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida to describe utopian specters within capitalist society. But more recently, the music writer Simon Reynolds has specifically applied hauntology — literally, ghost logic — to music, using the term to describe the playfully eerie studio-as-séance-site releases on the British label Ghost Box, and similar recordings.Read more »

Call of the grisly

Paco Ignacio Taibo II constructs a guide to corruption in Mexico City Noir

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

LIT With volumes devoted to numerous U.S. cities and quite a few foreign capitals, it sometimes seems as if Akashic Books' expanding line of noir story anthologies will wind up covering virtually every major metropolis on earth. Because less gritty burgs like Portland, Ore.; Seattle; and Phoenix all have entries in the crime fiction series, it's only fair that Mexico City gets a nod.Read more »