Music

Flame on

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kimberly@sfbg.com
SONIC REDUCER To the naked eye — and deep-fried, extra-crispy spirit — working fast food is a lot like what the Flaming Lips call the "sound of failure" on their latest album, At War with the Mystics (Warner Bros). It's the worst of times ... and the worst of times. Read more »

The planet of the mutants

Os Mutantes are back — in truthful Tropicália technicolor!
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johnny@sfbg.com
It's been nearly 40 years since Sérgio Dias Baptista of Os Mutantes saw Ten Years After at the Fillmore, but he still has, well, vivid memories of his first visit to San Francisco as a naive 17-year-old. He remembers sitting on a bench at a park in Haight-Ashbury and seeing a man on a faraway hilltop slowly walking toward him, until the man finally arrived — to offer Dias what he claims was his first joint. "I think it was also the first time someone showed me a peace sign, and I didn't understand what was that," the ebullient guitarist says. Read more »

A band of sisters

As Sleater-Kinney, Destiny's Child, and le Tigre bid farewell, an ex-all-girl punk band member wonders, where have all the music-making women gone?
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kimberly@sfbg.com
Cast your eyes on the Billboard chart and it seems like summer 2006 will go down in history as the season of the Latin diva, with Nelly Furtado doffing a soft-focus folkie-cutie image by declaring herself "Promiscuous" and Shakira holding on to the promise of, well, that crazy, sexy, but not quite cool chest move she's close to trademarked via "Hips Don't Lie." Rihanna and Christina Aguilera brought up the rear of the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart last week — solo singers all. Read more »

Sunny side of the scream

In a world of disappearing all-female bands, the Bay Area's Erase Errata turn in their strongest recording to date
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kimberly@sfbg.com
The Greek deities might throw lightning bolts and issue stormy protests, but when I first saw Erase Errata in November 2001, they seemed less a fledgling local all-girl band than scruffy goddesses sprung full grown from the temple of ... Mark E. Smith. The year-and-a-half-old foursome opened for the newly reenergized, near-surfabilly Fall and they were staggering — seeming grrrlish prodigies who picked up the sharp, jagged tools discarded by Smith with a confidence that seemed Olympian (as in Washington State and Zeus's heavenly homestead). Read more »

Ejaculoid!

Super Ego vs. Ejaculoid: A wild time with MC Cookie Dough and Dee Jay Pee Play
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superego@sfbg.com
SUPER EGO Oh, the endless string of characters! Clubland just keeps ’em comin' in glorious, sequin-spangled kablooeys. Go on, children, do it while you still got freedoms. And tits to you for saving Pride. Pink Saturday was a nightmare, the Dyke March was a walkathon, and despite the amazing turnout — that whole outpatient rehab thing must really be catching on — Pride Sunday found me huddled at the foot of the Tylenol PM booth, cursing the sunlight and desperately searching for something, anything, worth following home. Read more »

Sweet 16mm

Small Sails float their own kind of rock show experience
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
In 1967, the Bay Area's Brotherhood of Light transformed the average rock show into a full-blown psychedelic spectacle. Using 16mm film and Technicolor dyes and oils, the collective began projecting swirling visuals on larger-than-life backdrops at venues like the Fillmore. Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and, of course, the Dead all got the Brotherhood treatment. Read more »

Sexy transmissions

Sublime Frequencies issue more transcendent sounds — and images — from across the pond
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Low-flying Seattle ethnomusic label Sublime Frequencies has been in business for less than three years, but in that time established itself as easily the most happening label around in terms of hard-to-find music from overseas. Read more »

One Lives to live

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By Kimberly Chun
kimberly@sfbg.com
SONIC REDUCER I fell in love with the recent Ray Davies solo album, Other People's Lives (V2). Face it, I fall in love all the time — with records, of course — but I think I truly did love about three-fourths of the Kinks leader’s solo debut for the first four listens. Then I stopped listening and just coasted on the afterglow.
But you fall out of love. The fifth or sixth listen comes around and little things start to break down for you. Read more »

The Wolf that Peter built

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Prohibition saw the blossoming of alcoholic communing. Antismoking laws brought smokers closer together. So what about this musical wolf craze, Wolfmothers and Wolfkings, the endless urge to shape-shift? We're becoming more human.
Note the outpouring of pop collectives that are truly collective. Observe Austin, Texas's Peter and the Wolf, Red Hunter's experimental folk project, whose acoustic performances in graveyards, in abandoned buses, even on an island, have put them on the map. Read more »

What's the Damaged?

The Vans Warped Tour continues to mangle one young (and old) mind at a time
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Look, I tried — as much as any 35-year-old can be expected to try — to get excited by, or even minimally interested in, the Warped Tour. Excuse me — what I mean is the Vans Warped Tour, featuring the Volcom Stage, and the Guitar Center Warp Your Summer with NOFX contest, and the Energizer Encore, wherein you can vote to see your favorite Warped band play 10 minutes longer. Why, if I could only see Davey Havok's frontal mullet, Cure fan circa ’86 hairdo for one-sixth of an hour longer, I think I'd need to change my underwear. Oh, wait — AFI aren’t playing? Read more »