Visual Art

Goldies Visual Art winner Tim Sullivan

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In his most recent San Francisco exhibition, at the cozy Little Tree Gallery in the Mission, Tim Sullivan managed to reanimate the late blond bombshell Jayne Mansfield. Mind you, he did it with a low-tech visual effect — a full-color glossy of the actress attached to a flat-screen monitor, a shifting blue sky visible through little almond-shaped slits in the eyes of the photograph. But the mixture of sublime pop (the elaborate media construct of Mansfield) with an almost metaphysical art reference is a key movement in Sullivan's appealing photography, video, and sculpture. Read more »

Pop lives

Phil Collins (not that one) and Fahamu Pecou add spirit to Warhol's legacy.
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johnny@sfbg.com
REVIEW There are different doors through which one can enter dunya dinlemiyor (the world won't listen), a 2005 video installation by British artist Phil Collins. One can chart the many passages that lead from Collins's work to the music of the Smiths, whose vocalist Morrissey chose an image from Andy Warhol's Trash to adorn the cover of the group's second attempt at creating a proper first album. In turn, those doors lead to Warhol's earlier screen tests, which Collins deliberately invokes through dunya dinlemiyor’s song-length portraits of Smiths fans in Istanbul. Read more »

The soul stirrers

See That My Grave Is Kept Clean sets PR against the spirit of Harry Smith
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The set is modestly spare, a disheveled if not quite ramshackle affair, being the basement studio of an imaginary low-watt radio station run by a solitary disc jockey (Peter Newton) with a thing for Japanese culture, an anguished relation to the American scene, and an insomniac disposition. Read more »

Big bang

Artists embrace spirituality and their many selves at "Cosmic Wonder"
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REVIEW Near the end of "Song of Myself," Walt Whitman's woozy celebration of the universe contained within, he asks, "Do I contradict myself?" then responds to his own query, "Very well, then, I contradict myself." This is followed by the oft-cited parenthetical thought, "I am large — I contain multitudes," a sentiment that has been variously expressed in art since Whitman did so at the turn of the 20th century. Read more »

A present from the past

Colter Jacobsen uses a pencil to turn old photos into "Your Future"
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johnny@sfbg.com
One of us is wearing green short-sleeved Lacoste, the other blue short-sleeved Sergio Tacchini. We've looked around his apartment, where he's leaving behind one shoebox-size tranquil bedroom — he’s now restlessly moving his belongings between two larger sun-drenched spaces. He jokingly calls one a massage room and the other a museum and talks about the patterns of shadows through his windows — how there's a shadow that looks like a dancing lady, and how the window that faces a church is both peaceful and a passage to a fantasy about priests. Read more »

Catch some rays

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Damn, it's been hard to stay focused since the rain stopped. So many beers in the park to enjoy and so many great shows to see. Here are a few you should catch in between bike rides and slosh ball games.
Gregory Euclid's work must be seen in person, because no photos can do it justice. He's showing at White Walls through June, with Anthony Yankovic III and Teodor Dumitrescu, who are also amazing. Next door, the Shooting Gallery just opened its annual erotic show, where one can ogle boobies and butts in painted and photo forms. Read more »

Mr. Big Stuff

Matthew Barney lives large through his sprawling, spectacular art. Do we follow?
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America is unquestionably the land of the large. We well realize that gigantic things generate a sense of awe — along with danger — as it currently applies to presidential hubris and supersized snacks. Read more »

"The Man Box and Beyond"

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REVIEW Postfeminism — which is not the death of feminism so much as an effort to examine how culture creates gender differences in terms of how femininity and masculinity are defined — is a good place to start when thinking about the work included in "The Man Box and Beyond." The exhibition was inspired in part by an exercise from the Oakland Men's Project, a violence-prevention program that asks men how they feel when they're expected to "act like a man." The 15 participants in this show approach and extend this question through a range of responses from the Read more »

Art Picks

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'A Searing Lesson Every Girl Should Know'

ART Read more »