Visual Art

All that glitters

Jamie Vasta updates Caravaggio for the literary queer

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL What happens to appropriation after camp? That's the intriguing question posed and answered by Jamie Vasta's glitzy and technically impressive homage to late 16th- and early 17th-century Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, currently hanging at Patricia Sweetow.Read more »

Exercises in style

Former SF resident Will Yackulic explores painting in a new show at Gregory Lind, while Camilla Newhagen sculpts fabric at Jack Fischer

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arts@sfbg,com

HAIRY EYEBALL Will Yackulic's return to painting has none of the grandiosity or pretension that the phrase "return to painting" might suggest. Rather, Yackulic's abstract canvases at Gregory Lind offer a contained (one might say modest, even, as each rectangle measures in the neighborhood of 144 square inches) but no less exhilarating exploration of the tension between the two qualities of his work that are so perfectly pinpointed by the show's title, "Precision and Precarity."Read more »

Lucky charms, safe journeys

Yukako Ezoe reimagines the nature of self-portraiture in "Bahama Kangaroo"

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Touching from a distance

Song Dong's work at YBCA radiates an electric current of emotions

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL "Art enables us to meet my parents again after they have departed," the contemporary Chinese artist Song Dong says in a statement that introduces his current show at Yerba Buena Center of the Arts. "In my art, they have never been away, and will live with us forever. I think they might still be worrying about our children and us. I wanted to have an exhibition where we would bring them back to us and tell them, 'Dad and Mom, don't worry about us, we are all well.' "Read more »

Holy paint rollers

Mission street art takes a turn for the sainted

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The line, the line

A rare screening brings Philip Guston's art to light

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arts@sfbg.com

ART "Philip Guston: A Life Lived and Discussed" is an event for anybody who appreciates provocative talkers.Read more »

The unseen enemy

HAIRY EYEBALL: Trevor Paglen photographs the invisible, and Deva Graf sculpts contemplation

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Trevor Paglen's photography has always been about making the unseen visible. His luminous chromogenic prints unsettlingly reveal that the machinery of war and surveillance controlled by the military-industrial complex is more often than not hiding from plain sight; one need only have the right high-powered lens to gaze back.Read more »

Not forgotten

The SF Arts Commission Gallery's "Afghanistan in 4 Frames" brings together images from a quartet of photographers. SFMOMA's mammoth exhibition "Exposed" errs on the side of excess.

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL Around 500 people a day pass through the long corridor that bisects San Francisco City Hall's lower level: supervisors dashing to the café for a quick lunch; tour groups of elementary school children; aides making a post office run; the occasional member of a wedding party looking for the bathroom.Read more »

Every little star

Eva Hesse is showcased at Berkeley Art Museum, while Katy Grannan brings the streets to Fraenkel Gallery
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HAIRY EYEBALL In 1979, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive received a generous and somewhat unusual gift from the sister of the late German-born, pioneering American sculptor Eva Hesse: an assortment of small experimental works, made by Hesse herself, in materials such as latex, cloth, wax, fiberglass, wire mesh, and masking tape. What made these objects so unusual was their very indeterminacy. Should they be thought of as proper Hesse pieces? Read more »

Now and then

Lauren DiCioccio remakes the stuff of everyday in revelatory ways

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arts@sfbg.com

VISUAL ART "My ideal world [while making art] is to be on a comfortable chair by a sunny window listening to a baseball game," says Lauren DiCioccio. For DiCioccio, such a setting is possible, because sewing is an integral part of her work, whether she's hand embroidering The New York Times, creating cotton facsimiles of 35mm film slides and currency, or making organza replicas of plastic bags and bottles.Read more »