Visual Art

Holy paint rollers

Mission street art takes a turn for the sainted

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The line, the line

A rare screening brings Philip Guston's art to light

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arts@sfbg.com

ART "Philip Guston: A Life Lived and Discussed" is an event for anybody who appreciates provocative talkers.Read more »

The unseen enemy

HAIRY EYEBALL: Trevor Paglen photographs the invisible, and Deva Graf sculpts contemplation

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Trevor Paglen's photography has always been about making the unseen visible. His luminous chromogenic prints unsettlingly reveal that the machinery of war and surveillance controlled by the military-industrial complex is more often than not hiding from plain sight; one need only have the right high-powered lens to gaze back.Read more »

Not forgotten

The SF Arts Commission Gallery's "Afghanistan in 4 Frames" brings together images from a quartet of photographers. SFMOMA's mammoth exhibition "Exposed" errs on the side of excess.

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL Around 500 people a day pass through the long corridor that bisects San Francisco City Hall's lower level: supervisors dashing to the café for a quick lunch; tour groups of elementary school children; aides making a post office run; the occasional member of a wedding party looking for the bathroom.Read more »

Every little star

Eva Hesse is showcased at Berkeley Art Museum, while Katy Grannan brings the streets to Fraenkel Gallery
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HAIRY EYEBALL In 1979, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive received a generous and somewhat unusual gift from the sister of the late German-born, pioneering American sculptor Eva Hesse: an assortment of small experimental works, made by Hesse herself, in materials such as latex, cloth, wax, fiberglass, wire mesh, and masking tape. What made these objects so unusual was their very indeterminacy. Should they be thought of as proper Hesse pieces? Read more »

Now and then

Lauren DiCioccio remakes the stuff of everyday in revelatory ways

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arts@sfbg.com

VISUAL ART "My ideal world [while making art] is to be on a comfortable chair by a sunny window listening to a baseball game," says Lauren DiCioccio. For DiCioccio, such a setting is possible, because sewing is an integral part of her work, whether she's hand embroidering The New York Times, creating cotton facsimiles of 35mm film slides and currency, or making organza replicas of plastic bags and bottles.Read more »

La Frontera

Hairy Eyeball: Tracey Snelling's 10-year retrospective at Rena Bransten haunts the edge of town, while Max Cole's show at Haines gets geological

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL Walking through Tracey Snelling's 10-year survey at Rena Bransten brings to mind the famous opening tracking shot of Orson Welles' 1958 noir Touch of Evil. For over three tension-ratcheting minutes Welles' camera — all swooping omniscience — takes in the garish sights and sounds of a tourist outpost along the U.S.-Mexico border as it tails an American car that, unbeknownst to the couple behind the wheel, has been planted with a bomb that's about to go off.Read more »

50 years in exile

Jaime Cortez envisions the "Universal Remote" known as Michael Jackson

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arts@sfbg.com

VISUAL ART In 1988, Jeff Koons unveiled Michael Jackson and Bubbles, three ceramic sculptures of the pop icon and his pet chimpanzee. Koons' sculptures, syncing his kitsch with Jackson's gaudy tastes, were the conclusion of a series titled "Banality."Read more »

Coming attractions

Hey young (and more seasoned) art lovers -- here's some 2011 gallery musts

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL Welcome to 2011. It's a new dawn, it's a young decade, and I'm feeling good about the following shows worth eyeballing now or further down the line.

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Light fantastic

Let your mind's eye travel through the "Zone Modules" of Suzy Poling

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