Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture

Your cassette pet

Rob Sheffield writes the book of mixtape love
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com

REVIEW How's this for a universal truth: if you've ever given a good goddamn about music and you've ever been touched by someone in your life (or wanted to be touched, as the case may be), you've surely sat yourself down and made a mixtape to put all of those feelings into 90 minutes or less. Read more »

"Enter the Center"

Ribbons Productions expands beyond direct collaboration
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REVIEW Full disclosure would take up the full piece, so I'll just say that in spite of knowing both David Wilson and Frank Lyon well as friends, I'm hardly alone in counting them as two of the Bay Area's most celebratory and engaging young creators. They've largely steered their efforts away from the typical venues that comprise San Francisco's music-art coordinates thus far, especially in their periodic outdoor music gatherings. Read more »

Caine is able

Michael Caine -- minus Austin Powers, sharks, and killer bees
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The opening scene in a tragically forgotten 1968 swinging-London artifact called The Touchables — released stateside to universal catcalls — had four model-gorgeous "birds" breaking into an off-hours Madame Tussaud's. Goal: stealing the object of their desire, a wax dummy of Michael Caine. This proves too fleet a diversion — the glamorous gang are soon off to their next plot-dominating caper, hijacking a handsome pop star to a countryside inflatable plastic pleasure dome for extended go-go dancing and S-M games. Read more »

"Pablo Guardiola"

Photographs that prove deceptive yet captivating
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REVIEW Although, on entering Little Tree Gallery, it seems that Pablo Guardiola's show consists of only seven photographs, that small collection forms the crux of a multidimensional presentation. The images have slight subjects and document the finite and the ephemeral. In Much More Than a Brand of Crackers, a Beer, a Malt Beverage and a Legendary Taino Leader (2007), a bottle cap is captured after being flung onto an asphalt surface. Read more »

Bound for better

Slingshot organizes your life with joyful chaos
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kimberly@sfbg.com

INTERVIEW You probably stumbled over it during your holiday shopping travails: a little 2008 pocket date book branded "Slingshot" with a hand-drawn cover of kids wearing engineer boots and "A is for anarchy" garb, picking flowers, vegetables, and fruit in an idyllic garden scene, a cityscape looming in the distance. Read more »

Home is where the art is

A quick Q&A with Margaret Tedesco of [2nd floor projects]
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Margaret Tedesco is often on the move. She's created flip books, directed plays, narrated films — before neo-benshi events became popular locally — and put together art shows at roving venues in Southern California and San Francisco. Read more »

Kuchar coup

George and Mike Kuchar's drawings and paintings tickle pleasure centers
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johnny@sfbg.com

The drawings and paintings of George and Mike Kuchar are brightly colored, bosomy, and bulbous bouquets of bodacious flesh. Those bountiful breasts belong to women in George's 1962 painting Voodoo Ceremony and in his 1977 Missionary Attack, in which a topless lady sporting an octopus skirt threatens to spear another wearing tiger skin pants and leather boots. But in Mike's art the big bazookas belong to men. Read more »

Video Mutants: Shirtless on YouTube

Crocker vs. Cooper! The Passionistas take on the "Leave Britney alone!" star
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The Passionistas, "Wild West"

GAZE ON THE INTERNET I guess I'm a true romantic. I like my porn softcore. When I get in that certain mood, I visit YouTube to watch videos because I know they'll never go too far. Read more »

Oops! They did it again

W. Kamau Bell takes his swing at racism
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kimberly@sfbg.com

The best comedians always shear close to the bone with their truths, but believe it or not, few are necessarily a gut bust in conversation. Why is this a surprise? After all, the comic is on the interviewer's mic, not on the clock and on script. Yet W. Read more »

75 alive

The oldest ballet company in the country intends to show that the dance form is a thoroughly contemporary, international art.
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With its 75th season, which starts Jan. 29, the San Francisco Ballet — the oldest ballet company in the country — intends to show that the dance form is a thoroughly contemporary, international art.

With the exception of the lovely Giselle (created by Adolphe Adam in 1841), the entire season has been choreographed within the company's lifetime. When it was created in 1938, Lew Christensen's Filling Station was considered the first American ballet. Read more »