Editors Notes

Editor's Notes

Jerry's picnic table and cell phone crackdown got all the budget cut press

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You want a really bleak picture of the politics of California today? Check out the recent comments of Dan Schnur, GOP political consultant and director of the Jesse Unrush Institute for Politics at the University of Southern California.

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Schnur discussed the disconnect between image and reality in this state: "Cut $1 billion out of Medi-Cal and most voters won't notice," he said. "Take away some cell phones and make legislators sit on a picnic bench, and they pay attention." Read more »

Editor's Notes

I worry so much about the poor rich

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tredmond@sfbg.com

This is how strange things are in the world:Read more »

Editor's Notes

These days being progressive isn't about real estate — it's that the level of economic inequality has risen to levels unseen since the late 1920s.
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tredmond@sfbg.com

Former Mayor Willie Brown says that choosing a person of color for a leadership position should be a progressive value. Board of Supervisors President David Chiu says the new mayor, Ed Lee, is a progressive. Several supervisors and other political observers say the six-vote progressive majority on the board is gone.

And nobody really talks about what that word means. Read more »

Editor's Notes

Social inequality is wrong -- and it makes you fat

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tredmond@sfbg.com

Social inequality is morally wrong, politically dumb, and economically unsustainable. It also makes you fat.

Seriously.Read more »

Editor's Notes

If you want to be mayor, you need to get out there

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tredmond@sfbg.com

Art Agnos spent six terms in the California Assembly and four years as mayor; he doesn't need my political advice. But I gave it to him anyway the last time I saw him, when he expressed an interest in serving out the remainder of Gavin Newsom's term.Read more »

Editor's Notes

The United States economy has shifted radically, and the focus on labor benefits is misguided

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tredmond@sfbg.com

When the talk comes around to budget politics these days — and these days, nobody in politics can talk about much else — there's a pretty consistent line out there, from the mainstream left to the far right, and it goes like this:Read more »

Editor's Notes

The Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council Recycling Center pays rent, creates job, and has broad public support. So why was it evicted?

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tredmond@sfbg.com

In the grand scheme of things — the $400 million budget deficit, the pending selection of a new mayor, that sort of thing — the eviction of the Haight Ashbury Neighborhood Council Recycling Center doesn't sound like an earthshaking issue. The San Francisco Chronicle's C.W. Nevius (who is pretty much on the wrong side of everything these days) proclaimed last week that it was just a little neighborhood tiff, nothing to do with the soul of the city.Read more »

Editor's notes

Why doesn't wealth inequality get discussed by polite economists?

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Tredmond@sfbg.com

The New York Times, the old established voice of the liberal media elite, ran a piece on Sunday looking for answers to the nation's persistent economic crisis. Reporter David Segal interviewed prominent economists on the left and right — the likes of John H. Cochrane at the University of Chicago, James K. Galbraith at the University of Texas, even Gar Alperowitz at the University of Maryland, who's kind of (God help us) a socialist.Read more »

Editor's notes

Santa Claus or schools? California voters have to choose one

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Tredmond@sfbg.com

The pollsters like to call it the Santa Claus effect, and we've seen it over and over in surveys of California voters in the past few months. I think of it more as some sort of deep political pathology, a schizophrenia combined with delusions that underlies the state's inability to get anything done.

Here's what the data shows:Read more »

Editor's Notes

What if we chose the next mayor of San Francisco in public?

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tredmond@sfbg.com

Imagine if the next mayor of San Francisco was chosen in public. I don't mean the supervisors voting in public — they'll have to do that at some point anyway. I mean the various possible candidates going through a process that allows the public to see who's on the short list — and where those candidates are on the issues.Read more »