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News and Politics | San Francisco Bay Guardian

Cycling to City Hall

Bike to Work Day's 20th anniversary shows how far we've come, but funding shortfalls show how far we have to go to create safe streets

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steve@sfbg.com

When the first Bike to Work Day was held in San Francisco 20 years ago, cyclists had little support in City Hall. But on May 8, almost every one of the city's top political leaders will take part in Bike to Work Day, pledging their support to an increasingly popular and important transportation option.

In fact, Bike to Work Day has become such an anticipated event in San Francisco that city officials and cycling advocates in recent years have used it as the deadline to unveil the latest high-profile bike project to demonstrate the city's commitment to cycling.Read more »

Two views of the waterfront

Controversial developments proposed for Port of San Francisco property trigger public debate about who should control the city's valuable edge

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rebecca@sfbg.com

The Golden State Warriors' announcement that its planned 18,000-seat basketball arena would be moved off the San Francisco waterfront was fresh in everyone's mind when former San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos visited the Bay Guardian office on April 23, and he was electrified by the win.

"I resent anyone suggesting that this is not a genuine people-powered victory — again," Agnos said. "Because that's what it was, bottom line."Read more »

Lawsuits target Airbnb rentals

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LAWSUITS TARGET AIRBNB RENTALS

The San Francisco City Attorney's Office last week filed a pair of lawsuits against local landlords who illegally rent out apartments on a short-term basis, units that had been cleared of tenants using the Ellis Act. Meanwhile, the San Francisco Tenants Unions has hired attorney Joseph Tobener to file more such lawsuits, and he is preparing to file at least seven lawsuits involving 20 units.Read more »

Guardian endorsements

Campos for Assembly, Yes on Props. B and 42, re-elect Gov. Jerry Brown — our recommendations for the June 2014 primary election

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OUR CLEAN SLATE VOTERS GUIDE TO TAKE TO THE POLLS IS HERE.

 

Editor's Note: Election endorsements have been a long and proud part of the Guardian's 48-year history of covering politics in San Francisco, the greater Bay Area, and at the state level. In low-turnout elections like the one we're expecting in June, your vote counts more than usual, and we hope our endorsements and explanations help you make the best decisions.

 Read more »

Where there's smoke

San Francisco takes its pot smoking very seriously

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news@sfbg.com

It was April 20 in Golden Gate Park, the fabled 4/20 in the parlance of pot smokers, and we found Nick and Chris standing under the shade of a tree with a cluster of friends, including Geoff, the proud owner of a five-foot bong.

Nick had done several hits through the supersized smoking device that day. Beside him, Chris took hits from his own handheld bong. "I'm feeling good," Nick reported. "But I'm also kinda hungry. I could go for some Chinese food. Ohh, and some Sapporo!"Read more »

Politics over policy

Paid Sunday parking meters benefit drivers, businesses, and Muni riders. So why did the plan get killed?

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Joe@sfbg.com

Paid Sunday parking meters were unanimously repealed by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency Board of Directors on April 15.

Sunday meters will be free starting July 1, a losing proposition for many, including seniors and people with disabilities who advocated for free Muni passes at the same SFMTA meeting.Read more »

SFBG Wrap, April 16-23

BART fine for workers' deaths, supervisors outfox landlords, police tapes illuminate Nieto shooting, and the sorry state of public housing

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BART FINED FOR WORKERS' DEATHS

The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration has fined Bay Area Rapid Transit for three "willful/serious" safety violations in connection with the death of two transit workers last October, saying BART is at fault due to a lack of safety measures.

"Safety standards are designed to save lives," acting Cal/OSHA chief Juliann Sum said in a statement, "and they were not followed."Read more »

Left out

Progressive candidates for governor have a hard time amplifying their calls for economic justice

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steve@sfbg.com

It's never been easy for progressives to mount a serious campaign for the California governor's office. The high water mark was in 1934 when famous author/activist Upton Sinclair ran on his End Poverty In California platform and got nearly 38 percent of the vote despite being shut out by the major newspapers at the time.Read more »

Save the world, work less

With climate change threatening life as we know it, perhaps it's time to revive the forgotten goal of spending less time on our jobs

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steve@sfbg.com

Save the world, work less. That dual proposition should have universal appeal in any sane society. And those two ideas are inextricably linked by the realities of global climate change because there is a direct connection between economic activity and greenhouse gas emissions.

Simply put, every hour of work we do cooks the planet and its sensitive ecosystems a little bit more, and going home to relax and enjoy some leisure time is like taking this boiling pot of water off the burner.Read more »

Based on Earth

Thinking ahead to 2050, voyaging solo across the Pacific, celebrating earth Day ... Our new environmental column looks at how we're living within the natural world

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rebecca@sfbg.com

BASED ON EARTH San Francisco is often celebrated as one of the greenest cities in America. It's known for an eco-conscious citizenry and legislative hallmarks that banned plastic bags, made composting commonplace, and got everyone buying into the idea that mindful city dwellers would someday send no waste to the landfill.Read more »