Top Stories

Top Stories

Amalgamated health care

Newsom's incomplete health plan is merged with Ammiano's controversial one
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sarah@sfbg.com
Mayor Gavin Newsom has taken credit and sought the national spotlight for a plan he touts as an innovative way to deliver universal health care access to the city's uninsured. Yet Newsom has consistently ducked the vitriolic public debate over how to the pay for the plan, which a companion measure by Sup. Tom Ammiano would cover with a controversial employer mandate.
But as the measures were headed for the first of at least two hearings before the Board of Supervisors (on July 11 after Guardian press time), a board committee and Newsom's public health director, Dr. Read more »

Anatomy of a scandal foretold

How was the Mexican election stolen? Let us count the ways
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MEXICO CITY (July 7th) -- Mexican elections are stolen before, during, and after Election Day. Just look at what happened in the days leading up to the tightest presidential election in the nation's history this past July 2nd.

By law, the parties and their candidates close down their campaigns three days before Election Day. Read more »

Music for nothing

Two jaded rock fans take their ears — and sanity — to the max and tune in to 95.7 Max FM in a 24-hour listening orgy featuring a computer playing "whatever it wants, whenever it feels like it"
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com We're living in a golden age of commercial radio in the Bay Area: It's now possible to hear "Brandy" by Looking Glass on at least four stations. Ladies and gentlemen, meet 95.7 Max FM, the station that plays whatever it wants, whenever it feels like it, as long as it was a Top 40 hit between 1970 and 1995. Max FM, the station that never plays the same song in the same day, as long as you don't consider John Cougar Mellencamp's "R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A." and Huey Lewis and the News' "The Heart of Rock ’n' Roll" to be the same song. Read more »

Presidio bust

City officials and residents push the Presidio Trust to pay attention to more than just the bottom line
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amanda@sfbg.com
Can the Presidio Trust afford to listen to its neighbors? If not, it may just find city officials willing to play hardball over a controversial housing project.
Look at a map of San Francisco. Look closely at the northwestern corner: there are 1,491 acres of federally owned and operated land occupying about 20 percent of the city's space. Read more »

Headbanger's call to glory - line one

Ozzy defender and postmodern metal overlord Zakk Wylde picks up Randy Rhoads’s mantle
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› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Zakk Wylde is a postmodern metal god. Or perhaps a modern post-metal god. With his long, flowing hair and beard, bulging muscles, and Les Paul wielded like a battle ax, he is a figure straight out of mythology. Read more »

For bicyclists, some good news...

City aims to open up its hidden waterfront with trails, parks, and art
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steve@sfbg.com
San Francisco's southeastern waterfront is a natural jewel buried under the city's industrial past.
The coastline is warm and often beautiful but marked mostly by collapsing piers, rusting skeletons of industrial centers, two power plants, and other long abandoned maritime projects.
But city and port officials, with the support of civic groups, are embarking on an ambitious effort to open up the waterfront with new bicycle and pedestrian trails, rotating public artwork, improved aquatic access, spruced up waterfront parks, rebuilt piers, and the transformation of industrial pr Read more »

Pier review

Burning Man art and a sense of how far the Embarcadero has come awaken the new Pier 14
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This summer there are three giant additions to San Francisco’s Embarcadero and all three represent huge victories in uniting the city with its waterfront and artistic roots.
For the next six months, Passage — two 30-ft welded sculptures, representing a mother and child and covered with countless recycled metal objects, including horseshoes, herons, and even a kitchen sink—will grace the entrance to the newly dedicated Pier 14. Read more »

...And some bad

Lawsuit by virulent antibicycle activist halts all pedaling projects
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steve@sfbg.com
Bicycle projects in San Francisco — from the ambitious Blue Greenway initiative to new bike lanes to the simple shared-lane arrows, or "sharrows," that have been painted on some roadways — have been shut down by a preliminary injunction that Judge James Warren signed as one of his final actions before retiring.
The ruling is part of a lawsuit brought by Rob Anderson, a 63-year-old dishwasher, blogger (whose District 5 Diary regularly blasts the "bike nuts" and "anticar activists"), and failed District 5 supervisorial candidate. Read more »

Shotgun marriage

Like it or not, Newsom may need Ammiano's employer mandate to make his health plan work
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sarah@sfbg.com
Mayor Gavin Newsom has garnered media accolades for his San Francisco Health Access Plan, which would provide the city's 82,000 uninsured residents a package of health care services, including preventative, primary, specialty, and emergency care, lab work, X-rays, pharmaceuticals, and inpatient hospitalization.
All of this sounds good until you consider how the press has glossed over serious flaws in Newsom's plan, which was coauthored by Sup. Tom Ammiano. Read more »

Why is Asa Sullivan dead?

After two weeks, the San Francisco Police Department still can't get its story straight — but the questions are mounting
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> gwschulz@sfbg.com

Kahlil Sullivan hasn't had time to do much lately other than plan for his younger brother's funeral. He hasn't even had time to find out exactly why his brother is dead.
"We feel like we're lost," he said over the phone a week after his cornered and unarmed brother was shot and killed by the San Francisco Police Department.
The cops have offered two stories as to why officers fired a still-undisclosed number of bullets into the body of Asa Sullivan on June 6. Read more »